Home
Home
Forums
Forums
Downloads
Downloads
Account
Account
Advertise on IAH
Main Menu   
 
HomeHome  
    Home
Community  
    Forums
    FAQ
    Content
    Gallery
    Reviews
    Surveys
    Topics
Members  
    Private Messages
    Your Account
    Profile
    Members List
Statistics  
    Statistics
Files & Links  
    Downloads
    Web Links
News  
    News
    Submit News
Other  
    Advertising
    Shout Box
    Site Map
    Recommend Us
    Feedback
    Legal Notices


User Info   
 
Good morning 
Anonymous



Register
Lost Password
Username
Password

 Online:   
Member(s):
01netherwinterknights
02nicks
03parthapratim22
04Riaz
05shyamhegde
06spooky
07Vinodbv

Guest(s):
08. Guest
09. Guest
10. Guest
11. Guest
12. Guest
13. Guest
14. Guest
15. Guest
16. Guest
17. Guest
18. Guest
19. Guest
20. Guest
21. Guest
22. Guest
23. Guest
24. Guest
25. Guest
26. Guest
27. Guest
28. Guest
29. Guest
30. Guest
31. Guest
32. Guest
33. Guest
34. Guest
35. Guest
36. Guest
37. Guest
38. Guest
39. Guest
40. Guest
41. Guest
42. Guest
43. Guest
44. Guest

Most Ever Online:   
 Guest(s): 464
 Member(s): 16
 Total: 480

Forums Forums:   
 Posts: 329,115
 Topics: 28,983




http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/ :: View topic - THE BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORN KEEPING
Forum Index  |  Search  |  Usergroups  |  Edit your profile  |  Members  |  Log in to check your private messages
Ranks  |  Staff  |  Statistics  |  Board Rules  |  Forum FAQ  |  Log in



THE BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORN KEEPING
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic   printer-friendly view    http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/ Forum Index -> Cichlids
View previous topic :: View next topic  

What is your opinion about this thread?
It is very useful
95%
 95%  [ 20 ]
I contributed to it by adding more information or making corrections
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
It was of no use
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
I am not interested in flowerhorn keeping. So it doesn't matter to me
4%
 4%  [ 1 ]
Total Votes : 21

Author Message
TheChannaGuy
Frequent Visitor to IAH
Frequent Visitor to IAH



Joined: Dec 16, 2010
Posts: 125
Location: Mumbai

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 11:15 pm Post subject: THE BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORN KEEPING Reply with quote

 This  is  an  aggregation  of  Kastor's  posts  so  far  on  flowerhorn  keeping,  a  task  that  took  me  all  day  long.  He's  out  of  station  for  a  few  days  and  couldn't  manage  it  from  his  mobile's  gprs  and  so,  entrusted  this  herculean  task  upon  me.  After  burning  my  right  eardrum  for  three  hours  on  phone  with  him  and  another  five  sifting  through  540  posts  and  selecting  relevant  stuff  and  arranging  it  according  to  his  precise  instructions,  here's  the  result.  Kastor  will  take  it  from  here.                       -  TheChannaGuy
 
 
 
 
 Kastor48252:
 "Inspired  by  Balaji's  brilliant  idea,  I  decided  to  start  a  single  huge  thread  on  flowerhornkeeping,  so  that  any  flowerhornkeeper,  myself  included,  who  needs  help,  shall  find  it  at  one  single  place.  I  kickstarted  this  by  aggregating  all  my  previous  posts  related  to  Flowerhornkeepig  on  IAH,  worthy  of  finding  place  in  such  a  thread,  with  tremendous  amount  of  help  from  The  Channa  Guy.  He  was  kind  enough  to  arrange  all  these  random  posts  in  a  meaningful  order.  I  hope  that  his  efforts  won't  go  in  vain.
 This  is  just  the  beginning.  This  thread  is  in  no  way,  complete.  I  have  written  these  posts  to  the  best  of  my  knowledge  in  that  particular  period  of  time.  There  might  have  been  some  minor  edits,  but  in  no  way  have  these  posts  been  tailored  for  this  particular  thread.  So  the  information  may  still  appear  to  be  fragmented  and  incomplete.  I  humbly  apologize  for  the  same.
 If  you  have  any  corrections  to  make,  you  may  do  so  freely.  If  you  have  any  information  to  add,  kindly  do  so.  Your  contributions  will  help  enrich  this  knowledge  pool  and  help  it  expand  further.  Let  us  leave  something  worthwhile  in  these  posts  for  the  next  generation  of  flowerhornkeepers.  Let  them  learn  from  our  experiences  and  save  some  fish  from  losing  their  lives  due  to  newbie  errors.
 I  myself  will  contribute  to  this  thread  from  time  to  time  when  I  learn  something  new  and  hope  that  you  will  do  so  too.
 If  you  are  sharing  your  post  from  another  thread  or  webpage,  kindly  add  a reference  link  to  that  thread  at  the  end  of  the  post,  so  that  if  the  reader  wishes  to  read  more  on  that  topic,  he  can  visit  the  particular  thread.
 A  poll  has  been  attached  to  this  thread.  Kindly  vote  in  it  so  that  the  contributors  know  what  you  think  about  it.  Without  wasting  any  time  in  further  details,  I  end  my  editorial  here.  Wish  you   a  Good  Read  and  Successful  Flowerhornkeeping."

 
 
 
 
 INTRODUCTION  TO  FLOWERHORNS  &  FACTORS  AFFECTING  FLOWERHORN  DEVELOPMENT
 Originally  posted  on  Flowerhornusa.com  by  myself.  Posted  in  IAH  on  Sat  Jun  13,  2009  1:05  am  
 
 The  term,  FLOWERHORN,  is  a  generalised  lingo  for  various  Central  and  South  American  Cichlid  hydrids,  created  by  selective  breeding  or  otherwise.[  For  it  cannot  be  denied  that  crossbreeding  is  a  normal  phenomenon  in  nature  and  has  had  a  lion's  share  in  evolution.  All  the  various  cichlid  varieties  are  a  result  of  successful  hybridisation  and  proliferation  of  the  new  hybrid  species  in  nature.  eg.  Differences  in  the  fauna  of  the  great  lakes  of  Africa.  However,  in  nature,  this  process  is  slow  and  on  a  minute  scale.  Plus,  there  is  elimination  by  natural  selection.  ].  Although  biologists  haven't  given  the  various  flowerhorns,  their  rightful  place  in  taxonomical  classification  of  animals  [  For  which,  they  cannot  be  blamed  ],  we  must  understand  and  assume  that  the  term  FLOWERHORN  incorporates,  in  itself,  half  a  dozen  unnamed  genera,  dozens  of  unnamed  species  and  hundreds  of  unnamed  varieties.
 
 Thus,  what  we  need  to  understand  here  is,  that  comparing  zz  with  kamfa  or  kamalau  or  jing  kang  or  whatever,  is  similar  to  comparing  gorillas  with  chimps  or  orangs  or  humans  or  whatever.
 
 Rather,  even  ZZ,  Kamfa,  Kamalau,  Jing  Kang  and  the  various  new  world  categories  are  broad  classes  and  have  wide  variations  in  the  phenotype  as  well  as  the  genotype  within  their  class  [  class,  not  as  in  taxonomical  class  ]  itself.
 
 Thus,  two  ZZs  [  for  that  matter,  even  two  blue  dragons  ]  might  not  be  genetically  similar.
 
 And  thus,  due  to  differences  in  the  lineage  of  individual  flowerhorns,  there  is  no  point  in  denying  the  role  that  genetic  factors  play  in  the  development  of  your  fish.  All  the  same,  food,  temperature,  water  parameters,  medications  broodcare,  etc.  have  their  own  role  in  the  development  of  the  fish.
 
 Moral  of  the  paragraph:
 
 100%  Development  of  Individual  Fish=  75%  Genetic  factors  +  25%  Environmental  factors.
 
 The  below  table  summarises  the  physical  characteristic  and  the  main  [  not  the  only  ]  factor/s  responsible  for  its  development  :-
 
 Type  of  fish  ---->  Genetic
 
 Primary/Base  color  ---->  Genetic
 
 Intensity  of  Pri.  Color  ---->  Mood
 
 Finnage  ---->  Genetic
 
 Secondary  color  ---->  Genetic
 
 Intensity  of  Sec.  Color  ---->  Food  +  Mood
 
 Extent  of  Sec.  Color  ---->  Genetic  +  Food
 
 Max  kok  size  ---->  Genetic
 
 Rate  of  kok  growth  ---->  Food
 
 Eye  color  ---->  Genetic
 
 Flowerline  ---->  Genetic
 
 Intensity  of  Flower  Color  ---->  Food  +  Mood
 
 Pearling  ---->  Genetic
 
 Extent  of  pearling  ---->  Genetic
 
 Rate  of  extension  of  pearling  ---->  Food
 
 Intensity  and  breadth  of  individual  pearls  ---->  Food
 
 Build  ---->  Genetic  +  Sex  +  Food
 
 Maximum  size  of  fish  ---->  Genetic  +  Disease
 
 Rate  of  fish  growth  ---->  Food  +  Water  parameters  +  Tank  size  +  Mates  +  disease
 
 Personality  ---->  Genetic,  Tank  size,  water  parameters,  mates,  temperature,  noise,  lighting,  disease  and  Keeper  interaction.
 
 Productivity/Fecundity  ---->  Genetic  +  age  of  attaining  sexual  maturity  +  age  of  initiation  of  breeding  +  disease
 
 Breeding  and  brood  care  ---->  Genetic,  Experience,  age,  compatibility,  noise  and  light  level,  disturbance,  tank  size,  water  quality,  live  feeds  and  safety  index.
 
 Health/disease  susceptibility  ---->  Genetic  +  food  +  water  parameters  +  Mood  +  Keeper's  experience
 
 Recovery  from  disease  ---->  Genetic  +  water  quality  +  immunity  +  timely  medical  intervention  +  Keeper's  Experience
 
 REF:  
 1)  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=152605&highlight=#152605
 2)  http://www.flowerhornusa.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=32182&hl=

 
 
 
 
 Why  to  buy  a  Flowerhorn  and  what  things  to  look  for  when  buying  a  new  flowerhorn
 Posted  on  Sun  Nov  06,  2011  2:05  am
 
 First  of  all,  let  me  tell  you  that  having  a  large  south  American  cichlid  in  the  tank,  especially  a  flowerhorn,  is  a  great  stressbuster.  These  guys  overflow  with  personality.  It's  like  having  a  puppy  in  your  tank.  So  the  decision  to  buy  a  flowerhorn  is  commendable.
 
 What  features  to  look  for  depend  on  what  type  of  flowerhorn  you  like.
 
 Commonly  available  strains  in  India  are:
 -Blue  Dragon  Zhenzhou   sold  as  'local  flowerhorn'.
 -Red  Dragon  Zhenzhou  sold  as  'red  dragon'.
 -Zhenzhoumalau  /  Indomalau  /  Indozhenzhou  sold  as  'pearl  flowerhorn'.
 -Thai  Silk
 -Faders  of  the  above  strains  sold  as  'albino  flowerhorns'
 -Short  bodied  variants  of  the  above  strains.
 -Hormone  enhanced  and  visco-injected  individuals  of  the  above  strains  sold  as  'Humpy  Head  Flowerhorn'  /  'Monkey  Head  Flowerhorn'  /  'Imported  Flowerhorn'  (  These  are  fish  ranging  from  2"  to  4"  with  a  large   disproportionate  kok  with  a  4  to  5  figure  price  tag.  Please  avoid  buying  these  if  possible.  )
 
 You  will  be  lucky  if  you  can  find  the  rarer  strains  of:
 -Kamfa  variants
 -Kamfamalau  variants
 -Golden  Monkey  /  Kamalau  Variants
 
 Lookup  the  abovementioned  FH  types  in  google  images,  youtube  and  in  the  masterpiece  galleries  of  aquatic  forums  and  choose  the  strain  of  your  liking.
 
 Observe  the  fish  for  adequate  amount  of  time  before  choosig  one.  Be  it  any  strain,  the  individual  fish  should  have  the  following  features:
 -Good  colouration  (  inclusive  of  distribution  and  intensity  of  base  colour,  flowerline,  secondary  colour  and  pearling  )
 -Good  bodyform  (  good  symmetry  and  a  greater  depth/length  ratio  )
 -Erect,  flowing  finnage  and  a  open,  non-drooping  and  relatively  broad  tail.  
 -Active  and  responsive  personality  and  should  feed  readily.
 -If  the  babies  are  lesser  than  1.5",  as  a  rule,  go  for  the  largest,  fattest  and  most  dominant  one.  
 -If  you  have  a  friend  who  is  experienced  in  Flowerhornkeeping  or  if  a  local  experienced  IAH  member  is  available,  you  can  take  him/her  along  to  help  you  in  choosing  the  right  fish.
 -If  you  can  take  a  snap/vid,  post  it  here  so  that  we  can  help  you  in  choosing  the  best  of  the  lot.
 
 Please  don't  consider  head  /  kok  size  as  a  parameter  of  good  quality.  You  will  get  scammed  by  some  LFS  thug  if  you  go  kok  hunting  specifically.
 Kok  develops  with  age.  It  is  desirable  but  not  essential.
 
 Whatever  fish  you  choose,  give  him  atleast  50  gallons  of  water.  Keep  him  in  a  bareborrom  with  adequate  lighting  and  filtrtion.  Give  him  good  quality  pellet  food  on  demand  (  No  livefeeding  please  )  and  a  personal  level  of  care.
 
 At  the  end  of  the  day,  whatever  fish  you  choose,  it  will  guaranteedly  give  you  satisfaction  and  a  reason  to  smile.
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=267490&highlight=#267490
 
 
 
 
 
 At  what  size  should  Flowerhorns  be  bought?
 Posted  on  Sun  Nov  06,  2011
 
 In  my  opinion,  The  money  factor  apart,  always  go  for  a  juvie.  You  don't  want  to  miss  the  fun  in  raising  it.  You  share  a  special  father-son/daughter-like  bond  with  the  fish  when  you  have  raised  it  from  a  juvenile  stage.  Due  to  this  bond,  even  an  averagely  developed  fish  appears  like  a  masterpiece  to  you.  
 
 In  my  experience,  by  2  years  of  age,  even  a  flatheaded  flowerhorn  gets  a  kok,  however  small.  But  it  is  the  coloration,  health  status  and  personality  that  matter  in  the  end.  Think  of  the  kok  as  a  bonus.  Don't  expect  it  all  the  time.  That  way,  if  your  fish  doesn't  develop  a  satisfactory  kok  you  won't  lose  interest  in  raising  him  and  if  he  develops  a  kok,  you  feel  like  the  luckiest  guy  in  the  world.
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=267534&highlight=#267534
 
 
 
 
 Grading  of  Flowerhorn  Fry
 Posted  on  Wed  Nov  23,  2011  10:43  pm
 
 A  classification  is  in  place  to  Grade  flowerhorn  fry  based  on  the  primary  flowerline.  It  serves  as  a  guide  to  select  fry  for  raising  and  sale  while  the  rest  are  culled.  
 
 It  is  as  follows.  
 Grade  AAA      A  continuous  flowerline  from  the  operculum  to  the  base  of  caudal  fin.  
 Grade  AA         A  continuous  flowerline  beginning  from  a  point  in  between  the  base  of  the  operculum  and  the  midpoint  of  the  body  and  extending  to  the  base  of  the  caudal  fin.  
 Grade  A           A  continuous  flowerline  extending  from  the  midpoint  of  the  body  to  the  bse  of  the  cuadal  fin.  
 Grade  B            A  continuous  flowerline  Beginning  from  a  point  in  between  the  midpoint  of  the  body  and  the  rear  quarter  of  the  length  of  the  body  and  extending  to  the  bse  of  the  caudal  fin.  
 Grade  C            A  continuous  flowerline  starting  at  the  rear  quarter  of  the  length  of  the  body  and  extending  to  the  base  of  the  caudal  fin  or  a  fragmented  flowerline  of  any  type  (freeflower).
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=269909#269909
 

 
 
 
 
 Growth  Rate  of  Flowerhorns
 Posted  on  Tue  Nov  08,  2011  1:12  am
 
 If  you  provide  good  water  conditions  and  a  nutrient  rich  diet,  the  growth  rate  of  a  juvie  flowerhorn  is  1  to  1.5  inches  per  month  till  it  reaches  between  8  to  10  inches  (  which  I  refer  to  as  the  'Growth  Phase'  ),  after  which,  the  growth  in  length  decelerates  and  the  increase  in  girth  and  depth  accelerates,  the  fish  appears  more  stocky,  gets  an  apparent  triple  chin,  full  cheeks,  thicker  jawset  and  the  kok  development  gets  a  boost.  In  short,  the  fish  starts  ballooning  up  after  the  end  of  the  initial  growth  phase  (  Hence,  I  refer  to  it  as  the  'Ballooning  Phase'  ).
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=267647&highlight=#267647
 
 
 
 
 Identification  of  Common  Flowerhorn  Strains
 Posted  on  Mon  Aug  22,  2011  12:34  am
 
 If  you  are  a  newbie  to  fowerhornkeeping  and  are  confused  by  the  various  misleading  names  given  to  fowerhorns,  there  is  no  alternative  to  extensive  research.  It  is  something  that  just  cannot  be  spoonfed.  Browse  through  the  masterpiece  galleries  of  various  flowerhorn  and  fishkeeping  forums  and  watch  and  rewatch   related  youtube  videos  until  you  spot  the  differences  and  are  able  to  identify  the  defining  features  of  the  Broad  strains.
 Flowerhorns  have  been  classified  by  laymen  and  not  taxonomists  and  the  traits  are  dynamic.  These  fish  are  so  frequently  crossbred,  that  most  of  them  are  infertile  and  those  that  are  fertile,  donot  breed  true.  So  the  differences  aren't  clearcut.
 On  every  other  forum,  you  will  find  conflicting  ideas  on  features  and  a  lot  of  overlap.  So  gather  all  the  information  that  you  can  and  rely  on  your  own  judgement.
 When  you  google  up  and  visit  masterpiece  galleries,  pay  attention  on  the  body  form,  finnage  and  colouration.
 
 I  will  give  you  some  examples  of  the  defining  features  of  the  broadest  strains  which  might  aid  you  in  identification.
 
 KOK/NUCHAL  HUMP
 Zhenzhous  have  a  relatively  small  hard  kok.
 
 Kamalaus  have  a  large  hard  kok  that  is  in  perfect  proportion  to  their  body  depth.
 
 Kamfas  have  a  tumorously  massive  soft  kok  that  is  out  of  proportion  to  their  bodies  and  is  often  reddish  brown  in  colour,  irrespective  of  the  body  colour  and  exhibits  light  reflex.
 
 BODY  FORM
 Try  to  divide  a  flowerhorn's  body   (  as  viewed  from  the  side  )  into  four  quadrants  and  observe  the  following  points.
 
 1  upper  cephalic,  upper  caudal,  lower  cephalic   and  lower  caudal  slopes  of  the  body  from  operculum  to  mid  section  and  from  midsection  to  caudal  peduncle.
 2  symmetry  between  upper  slope  and  lower  slope.
 3  angle  between  body  and  caudal  peduncle
 4  Length/breadth  ratio
 
 Zhen  zhous  are  peach  shaped  with  assymetry  between  upper  and  lower  slopes   (  lower  slopes  are  flattened  )  and  cephalic  and  caudal  slopes  (  cephalic  slopes  are  sudden/steep  while  caudal  slopes  are  gradual.  Caudal  peduncle  makes  a  highly  obtuse  to  almost  180  degree  angle  with  the  body.  The  lower  jaw  is  protruding.
 
 Kamalaus  (  Golden  Monkeys  )  are  peach  shaped  with  good  symmetry  between  upper  and  lower  slopes.  Symmetry  between  Cephalic  and  caudal  slopes  is  similar  to  ZZs.  Caudal  peduncle  makes  a  low  obtuse  angle  to  almost  right  angle  with  the  body.
 
 Old  world  Kamfas  Have  a  much  flattened  bottom  and  a  highly  curved  back.  All  have  a  yellowish  white  iris  of  various  shades.
 
 New  world  kamfas  have  a  full  body  with  good  symmetry  in  all  quadrants.  Caudal  peduncle  is  thick  making  almost  90  degree  angle  with  the  body.  Most  hare  yellowish  white  irides,  but  many  have  red  irides  too,  so  iris  colour  cannot  be  a  solid  distinguishing  feature.
 
 FINNAGE
 
 Zhen  zhous  have  long  fins  with  dorsal  and  anal  trailers.  The  tail  is  teardrop  shaped.  the  caudal  fin,  dorsal  fin  and  anal  fin  are  widely  separated  apart.
 
 Kamalaus  have  brightly  coloured  erect  fins  with  plenty  of  pearls  and  wrap  tails.  the  caudal,  dorsal  and  anal  fins  have  a  narrow  gap  between  them.
 
 Kamfas  have  broad  finnage  with  no  trailers.  The  caudal,  dorsal  and  anal  fins  touch  each  other  and  may  overlap.  The  tail  is  fan  shaped.
 
 PEARLING
 
 Pearling  is  a  predominantly,  a  Kamalau  trait  and  is  accordingly  seen  in  kamalau  crosses  like  ZZmalau,  Kamfamalau,  King  kamfa,  Tan  King  Kamfa,  etc.
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=search&search_id=601390086&start=375
 
 
 
 
 Defining  Features  of  a  Kamfa
 Posted  on  Sun  Oct  30,  2011  3:31  pm
 
 There  aren't  any  hard  and  fast  rules  as  to  which  traits  define  a  particular  flowerhorn  strain  and  new  strains  appear  every  now  and  then  and  it  is  at  the  sole  discretion  of  the  breeder  as  to  what  his  brood  is  to  be  named.  However,  along  the  years,  some  traits  are  taken  for  granted  to  define  the  broader  classes  (  viz.  Zhen  zhou,  Kamalau  and  Kamfa  ).  Going  by  these,  there  are  many  different  strains  of  Kamfa,  but  all  of  them  share  the  following  traits.  The  Kamfa's  bodyform  is  almost  squared  (  deep  and  not  elongated  bodyform  with  apparent  right  angles  at  the  the  four  corners.  )  (Necessary  Trait).  The  Dorsal  and  Anal  fins  lack  trailers  (Optional  Trait).  The  tail  is  broad,  such  that  it  appears  to  be  continuous  or  overlaps  the  rear  free  margins  of  the  dorsal  and  anal  fins  (Necessary  Trait).  The  kok  is  large,  soft  and  exhibits  transluminescence  (Necessary  Trait).  The  jaws  are  symmetrically  aligned  (Necessary  Trait).  The  iris  is  pale  (Optional  Trait).
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=266758&highlight=#266758
 
 
 
 
 Regarding  King  Kamfas
 Posted  on  Tue  Nov  15,  2011  3:23  pm
 
 King  Kamfa  is  the  name  given  to  Kamfamalaus  who  retain  the  Kamfa  finnage  and  bodyform  while  incorporating  the  pearls,  flowers  and  vibrant  colouration  from  the  Kamalau.  The  best  of  both  worlds.
 Thus,  all  King  Kamfas  are  Kamfamalaus  but  all  Kamfamalaus  aren't  King  Kamfas.
 Leaving  the  monochrome  Kings  apart  (  considered  as  low  quality  and  sold  as  red/yellow/green/orange/brown  Kings  ),  they  are  further  divided  into  Rainbow  king,  Tan  King  and  Pearl  King  based  on  the  variation  in  base  colour,  flowerline  and  pearling.
 Thus,  these  are  basically  classified  on  the  basis  of  phenotype  and  not  the  genotype.  So  most  of  them,  if  at  all  fertile,  donot  breed  true.  A  single  batch  will  contain  more  than  80%  Kamfamalaus,  and  the  rest,  a  mixture  of  all   the  above  variants  and  that  too,  mostly  monochrome  King  Kamfas.  And  most  or  almost  all  of  them  will  be  sterile.
 Breeders  and  exporters,  in  order  to  maximize  their  profits,  then  give  these  guys  various  fancy  names  which  are  unheard  of  before.  Newbie  hobbyists  having  a  lot  of  dough  but  lazy  enough  to  conduct  prior  research  usually  fall  victim  in  their  desperation  to  lay  hands  upon  the  most  fashionable  and  uniquely  named  fish.
 In  all  of  this,  the  eye  colour  really  doesn't  matter.  It  really  isn't  part  of  the  criterion.  Personally,  I  think  the  coloured  eyes  look  way  better  than  the  white  eyes,  but  due  to  its  prolonged  association  with  the  classic  Kamfas,  the  white  eye  has  become  sort  of  a  status  symbol  and  a  lazy  way  to  ID  Kamfas  (  which  doesn't  stand  true  these  days  ),  inspite  of  its  lower  cosmetic  appeal.
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=268671&highlight=#268671
 
 
 
 
 Sexing  Flowerhorns
 Posted  on   Fri  Nov  11,  2011  5:26  pm
 
 I  usually  don't  like  venting  my  fish.  I  love  the  suspense  and  let  nature  reveal  the  sexes  of  my  flowerhorns.  I  find  it  thrilling.  But  if  you  want  to  enter  the  breeding  arena,  here  goes.  
 
 Venting  mature  flowerhorns  is  piece  of  cake.  If  you  observe  fully  fed  fish  close  enough,  you  don't  even  have  to  remove  them  to  view  their  bellies.  The  genital  pores  of  the  fish  are  located  on  a  retractable  anatomical  projection  called  the  genital  tubercle/papilla.  It  is  located  behind  the  anal  pore  and  in  front  of  the  first  ray  of  the  anal  fin.  These  tubercles  are  the  fish  equivalents  of  the  penis  and  the  vagina,  modified  for  the  act  of  external  fertilization.  
 
 The  male's  papilla  is  slim,  for  the  passage  of  semen  and  hence,  appears  to  have  a  V-SHAPED  tip.
 The  female's  papilla  on  the  other  hand,  is  thick  for  the  passage  of  the  large  eggs  and  hence,  appears  to  have  a  U-SHAPED  tip.
 
 As  I  mentioned  earlier,  these  tubercles/papillae  are  retractable  and  hence  can  be  viewed  naturally  only  when:
 -  The  fish  are  trying  to  breed.
 -  When  the  fish's  tummy  is  full  due  to  overeating,  gas  or  obstruction.
 Artificial  venting  is  done  by:
 -  Removing  the  fish  out  of  water,  held  in  a  soft  and  damp  cloth,  turning  it  over  to  observe  the  tubercle,  with  slight  pressure  on  the  belly  to  project  the  tubercle  out  of  the  abdomen.
 -  Excess  pressure  on  the  belly  leads  to  forced  ejaculation  of  semen  by  the  male  fish.  This  doesn't  happen  in  the  case  of   female  fish  since  eggs  need  to  mature  before  being  layed.  However,  if  the  eggs  are  mature  enough,  some  eggs  my  be  released  by  this  method.
 
 Other  than  venting,  there  are  other  parameters  that  can  be  used  to  sex  flowerhorns:
 -  Just  like  in  humans,  females  flowerhorns  have  a  bad  temper,  especially  when  in  heat.  Males  are  relatively  docile.  So  as  a  rule,  during  breeding,  the  male  must  ideally  be  atleast  2  inches  larger  than  the  female  or  he  is  more  prone  to  get  beaten  up  badly.
 -  Females  undergo  frequent  mood  swings,  exhibited  by  more  aggressive  or  skittish  behaviour  and  stress  marks/dark  banding/almost  darkening  to  black  colour,  with  the  exception  of  the  pearls,  atleast  once  every  couple  of  months.
 -  Females  have   comparatively  slower  rate  of  growth  than  their  male  siblings.
 -  Females  develop  smaller  koks  than  their  male  siblings.
 -  Females  balloon  up  lesser  than  their  male  siblings.
 -  Male  flowerhorns  respond  better  to  their  master,  are  more  playful,  hungrier  (their  frequent  begging  for  food  is  often  mistaken  for  aggression  ),  have  more  rounded  contours  and  have  brighter  colouration.  Females  on  the  other  hand,  are  sometimes  unresponsive,  eat  lesser,  are  slimmer  and  more  streamlined  and  have  relatively  duller  colouration.
 -  But  the  most  reliable  confirmation  of  sex  is  the  act  of  egglaying.
 
 The  age  of  laying  eggs  and  hence,  coming  of  age,  varies  according  to  the  strain  of  flowerhorn:
 Purebred  Zhen  Zhou  -  around   the  5th  month  of  life.
 Purebred  Kamalau      -  around  the  10th  month  of  life.
 Purebred  Kamfa           -  around  the  19th  month  of  life.
 These  are  just  average  estimates.  There  is  prone  to  be  individual  variation.  There  is  no  specific  age  estimate  for  hybrids.  
 
 Due  to  massive  inbreeding  and  crossbreeding,  many  flowerhorns  are  either  naturally  impotent  or  sterile  or  are  rendered  so  by  hormonal  abuse  and  selective  sterilization  by  breeders.  Even  a  sexually  healthy  pair  requires  a  few  failed  attempts  before  they  actually  succeed  in  producing  offsprings.  So  as  I  always  say,  breeding  flowerhorns  is  a  game  of  permutations,  combinations  and  a  lot  of  patience,  persistence  and  hard  work.
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=268178&highlight=#268178
 
 
 
 
 General  tips  for  Flowerhorn  Care
 Posted  on  Mon  Oct  31,  2011  5:10  pm
 
 1)  Provide  the  fish  atleast  50  Gallons  of  water  in  a  Barebottom  with  good  filtration.  (  Any  internal  filter  over  1500  L/Hr  will  do.  )
 
 2)  Super  /  Chilly  Red  Syn  is  useless.  It  is  intended  for  Super  Red  Synspilum,  Super  Red  Texas  and  Red  and  King  Kong  Parrots.  If  you  want  to  add  a  pigment  food,  Go  for  any  of  the  following,  preferred  according  to  order  (  There  are  many  other  good  or  better  feed,  but  this  is  what  I  prefer  ).
 -  Hikari  Cichlid  Bio  Gold  +
 -  Grand  Sumo  Red
 -  Chingmix  Maxima/Headbooster  SP100  PRO   
 -  Ocean  Free  XO  Ever  Red  (  not  Super  Red  Syn  )
 *  Chingmix  Headbooster  SP100  PRO  has  excellent  results,  but  is  costlier  than  the  rest.
 When  it  comes  to  a  feeding  regimen,  rather  than  going  for  a  single  all-in-one  pellet,  go  for  a  mix  of  3-4  different  pellets  proportioned  according  to  need.  Remember  that  costlier  isn't  always  better.  
 My  regimen  for  your  fish  would  be:
 -  Hikari  Cichlid  Staple/Excel                    (  Fibre  rich  )
 -  Chingmix  Headbooster  SP100  PRO  (  Mainly  for  Kok  development  )
 -  Grand  Sumo  Red                                       (  For  Colouration,  including  pearling  )
 or
 -  Hikari  Cichlid  Staple/Excel           (Fibre)
 -  Ocean  Free  XO  Ever  Red              (Red  Colouration)
 -  Ocean  Free  XO  Humpy  Head      (Kok)
 -  Ocean  Free  Xo  Starry                     (Pearling)
 To  bring  down  the  economics,  Increase  the  quantity  of  Fibre  feed  on  weekdays  and  limit  the  colour  feed  to  weekends  (exclusively).  There  won't  be  much  relative  change  in  the  development.
 Moisten  the  pellets  before  feeding  them  to  the  fish.  It  increases  palatability  and  reduces  wastage.
 Feed  pellets  one  by  one  and  let  the  fish  catch  them.  Feed  till  the  fish  stops  catching/regurgitates  out/swims  to  the  bottom.  Don't  feed  unless  the  fish  begs  for  food  (on-demand  feeding).  These  techniques  reduce  food  wastage,  increase  the  bonding  between  the  fish  and  the  owner  and  helps  you  keep  track  of  how  much  your  fish  is  eating  and  provides  an  early  indicator  of  any  disease  affecting  appetite.
 
 3)  Rather  than  carrying  out  weekly  water  changes,  spare  10  minutes  of  your  time  everyday  to  siphon  out  the  wastes  from  the  bottom  along  with  5-10%   water,  depending  on  the  feeding  quantity  and  frequency  and  the  resultant  waste  generation  and  top  up  the  water.  Topping  up  wan't  take  more  than  a  big  bucket  of  water  in  any  case.  
 Donot  clean  the  filter  media  frequently.  Let  it  build  up  a  good  Biofilm.  Biological  filtration  is  the  best  filtration.  Clean  the  filter  only  when  you  feel  that  the  flow  has  significantly  reduced/the  water  appears  hazy  or  tinted/the  media  appears  visibly  clogged.  I  clean  my  filter  media  once  every  60  to  90  days  along  with  a  major  water  change.  But  my  fish  eat  a  lot.  I  feed  them  about  6  to  10  times  everyday.  So  you  can  imagine  the  bioload.
 
 4)  Add  2-  4     >8"  plecos  to  clean  the  interior  of  the  tank  and  keep  the  Flowerhorn  active.
 
 5)  Add  a  little  non-iodised  salt  (  1-2  to  1  tbsp  per  big  bucket  )  to  the  water  after  every  change.  This  keeps  out  certain  freshwater  parasites  and  pathogens.  Plus,  Flowerhorns  love  salt.
 
 6)  It  is  wiser  to  add  Dechlorinator  to  the  water  or  age  the  water  before  introduction.
 
 7)  Donot  Livefeed  the  fish.
 
 8)  Observe  the  fish's  behaiour  and  look  out  for  any  sudden  change  in  it  and  be  on  the  lookout  for  any  early  signs  of  infection/infestation.
 
 9)  Donot  introduce  any  new  fish  in  his  tank  without  proper  quarantine.
 
 10)  Simulate  natural  light  as  far  as  possible.  Hitachi  soft  pink  aquarium  light  is  a  good  display  light  for  your  fish.  It  will  really  bring  out  its  colours.
 
 If  you  use  tap  water,  start  using  Dechlorinator.  It  is  available  in  a  plethora  of  local  brands.  Use  any  one.  The  dosage  is  usually  one  drop  per  litre.  But  that  again  depends  on  the  concentration  at  which  an  individual  lab  sells  it.   Read  the  instructions  on  the  individual  bottle  for  the  details.
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=search&search_id=601390086&start=90
 
 
 
 
 Can  and  should  Flowerhorns  be  kept  in  a  Commuity  Setup?
 Posted  on  Sun  Nov  06,  2011  7:55  pm
 
 Flowerhorns  share  the  aggressive  temperament  of  their  Central  and  South  American  ancestors.
 Sure  they  can  be  kept  in  community  aquaria  with  fish  of  similar  size  and  temperment.  But  you  need  to  add  plenty  of  ditherfish  and  see  to  it  that  the  aggression  is  well  distributed.
 
 The  above  things  considered  and  considering  the  highly  territorial  nature  of  these  fish,  especially  during  breeding,  it  is  imperative  that  you  must  either  have  a  large  tank  with  plenty  of  hiding  places  and  territorial  boundaries  or  settle  with  a  overstocked  tank.
 
 I  don't  know  about  the  others,  but  I  will  give  you  my  reasons  for  keeping  flowerhorns  only  with  plecos.  (  Note  that  I  started  flowerhornkeepig  in  a  community  tank  and  learned  by  experience  to  house  flowerhorns  alone.)
 -  I  like  to  have  a  personal  bond  with  my  fish.
 -  I  don't  like  it  when  my  fish  get  injured  or  their  fins  get  torn  and  deformed.
 -  I  am  lazy  and  prefer  reducing  my  work  by  reducing  the  number  of  fish.
 -  I  am  of  the  opinion  that  by  Housing  a  single  fish  in  a  tank,  I  can  provide  him/her  with  optimum  level  of  care  and  keep  him  free  of  communicable  diseases.
 -  I  think  that  a  large  cichlid  in  a  barebottom  tank  saves  me  a  lot  of  money  on  interior  decor  as  my  fish  remains  the  center  of  attraction  of  all  my  guests  who  know  him  as  an  individual.  (  Currently  I  am  growing  out  two  in  a  partitioned  tank.  )
 -  I  neither  have  the  money  nor  the  space  to  house  a  huge  tank,  but  this  is  how  I  try  to  provide  the  best  water  conditions  I  could  to  my  fish  in  a  confined  space.
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=267532&highlight=#267532
 
 
 
 
 Feeding  Flowerhorns
 Posted  On  Sat  Nov  19,  2011  4:50  am
 
 I  had  mentioned  my  principle  of  'On  Demand  Feeding'  in  some  earlier  posts.  I  have  based  it  on  the  simple  fact  that  though  fish  are  speechless,  you  can  make  out  from  their  body  language  when  they  are  hungry  and  are  begging  for  food.  They  are  just  like  our  babies,  who  cry  when  they  want  milk.  Feed  them  whenever  and  only  when  they  ask  for  food.  Only  the  fish  knows  how  hungry  he  is.  So  let  him  decide  how  many  pellets  he  can  eat  at  a  particular  time.  How  to  do  this?  Feed  him  pellets  one  by  one,  till  he  is  full.  Once  he  is  full,  he  will  retreat  to  the  depths  and  you  will  know  when  to  stop.  
 
 This  can  be  seen  in  the  following  video.  Rudie  (the  female  Zhenzhoumalau)  ate  till  her  stomach  got  full  and  then  retreated  to  the  bottom  while  Adolf  (the  male  fader/golden  base  zhenzhou)  lingered  at  the  top  and  kept  eating  till  his  belly  was  full  and  later,  retreated  to  the  depths  as  well,  thus  indicating  me  to  stop  feeding.
 
             
Link

 
 In  the  above  video,  the  green  pellets  are  Hikari  Cichlid  Staple  while  the  red  ones  are  Grand  Sumo  Red.  
 
 You  get  to  learn  new  things  everyday  from  this  hobby.  Every  fish  teaches  you  something  new.  Enriches  your  knowledge.  You  just  need  to  keep  your  eyes  open  and  mind  clear.  So  the  crude  experimentation  must  go  on.  I  tried  out  different  feeding  regimens  every  month  for  the  last  three  months  just  to  record  the  effects.  And  what  better  fish  to  try  out  colour  feed  upon  than  a  multicoloured  fader  ?  I  had  experimented  with  Asthaxanthin  based  supplements  before  on  my  earlier  fish.  That  only  taught  me  regarding  the  effect  of  colour  feed  on  the  development  of  the  secondary  colour.  This  time,  it  was  the  base  colour  that  interested  me  most.  The  observations  then  and  now,  however,  were  the  same.  Here  is  a  brief  summary  of  my  observation  so  far:
 
 1st  Month  (  August  -  Sep  2011  )
 Hikari  cichlid  staple  and  azoo  Arowana  Sticks.  No  colour  feed.
 
 2nd  month  (  Sep  -  Oct  2011  )
 Hikari  Cichlid  Staple  on  weekdays  (  Mon  -  Fri  ).  1:1  mixture  of  Hikari  cichlid  Bio  Gold  +  and  Grand  Sumo  Red  on  weekends.
 
 3rd  Month  (  Oct  -  Nov  2011)
 1:1  Mixture  of  Hikari  cichlid  staple  and  a  colour  feed  8  -  10  times,  depending  on  demand  everyday.  As  colour  feed,  I  used  Grand  Sumo  Red  and  Hikari  Cichlid  Bio  Gold  +  on  alternate  days.  While  feeding,  I  usually  alter  every  pellet  to  ensure  that  the  1:1  ratio  is  maintained.  But  due  to  the  camera  blocking  my  direct  sight,  I  had  a  hard  time  doing  so.
 
 Experience  so  far:
 The  colour  feed  did  help  in  bringing  out  the  colours  and  maintaining  them.  As  to  the  frequency  of  feeding  it,  it  didn't  matter  much.  
 If  you  compare  the  snaps  in  the  second  and  third  monthend  updates,  you  won't  observe  a  significant  difference  in  the  colouration.  
 Thus  minimal  amount  of  colour  feed  is  sufficient  for  bringing  out  and  maintaining  the  colours.  Daily  colour  feeding  isn't  required.  Don't  waste  money  on  excessive  colour  feeding.  Once  or  twice  a  week  is  enough.
 
 On-Demand  Feeding  has  the  following  advantages:
 -  You  don't  overfeed  your  fish.
 -  You  don't  waste  food.
 -  The  tanks  water  parameters  don't  deteriorate  faster.  
 -  You  bond  well  with  your  fish.
 -  The  fish  become  bolder  and  are  less  skittish  around  people.
 -  Since  you  feed  the  fish  whenever  they  are  hungry,  they  get  better  nutrition  and  grow  faster.
 -  Scavengers  donot  resort  to  eating  pellets.
 -  You  get  to  set  the  ratio  of  different  pellets  to  be  fed  to  an  individual  fish.
 -  You  get  to  feed  all  your  fish  selectively  and  see  to  it  that  no  particular  fish  goes  unfed  due  to  bullying  by  larger  fish  in  a  community  setup.  
 -  You  get  a  rough  idea  of  the  changing  appetite  trends  in  your  fish.  This  helps  in  early  diagnosis  of  diseases  that  affect  appetite.
 
 Pellets  should  be  mixed  in  such  a  way  that:  
 -  The  desired  effect  of  the  pellet  in  a  particular  fish  is  achieved  without  unnecessary  overfeeding.
 -  The  protein  content  is  equally  balanced  by  fibre,  that  provides  roughage  and  thus  prevents  constipation  and  bloating  due  to  excess  flatus/gas  formation.
 -  You  need  to  understand  the  difference  between  Macronutrients  and  Micronutrients.  A  good  staple  food  must  be  rich  in  Macronutrients.  Micronutrients  are  to  be  fed  in  small  quantities.  Excess  feeding  of  these  causes  wastage  and  hazards  due  to  overconsumption.  So  far,  I  find  Hikari  Cichlid  staple  to  be  the  best  staple  food  for  all  cichlids  including  flowerhorns.  Next  in  line  was  Azoo  Flowerhorn  pellets,  which  is  off  the  Indian  Market  as  of  now.  But  Hikari  Food  sticks  or  Azoo  Arowana  sticks  my  be  added  as  a  variation  in  the  staple  feed.  
 
 Pre-soaking  the  pellets  has  the  following  advantages:
 -  Brings  out  their  taste  and  thus  increases  their  palatability.  So  wider  variety  of  pellets  are  readily  accepted  without  much  fuss.
 -  The  pellets  get  softened  and  can  be  swallowed  without  much  chewing.  This  reduces  their  wastage  in  powder  form  caused  during  crushing  by  pharyngeal  teeth.
 -  You  must  always  remember  that  all  pellets  expand  after  absorbing  water.  Thus,  if  the  fish  eats  a  stomach-full  of  dry  pellets,  the  pellets  expand  in  their  bowels  after  absorbing  water  and  the  fish  gets  bloated,  constipated,  breathes  heavily  and  appears  lethargic  for  some  time  after  the  meal.  This  is  avoided  when  the  the  pellets  are  presoaked  and  already  assume  their  full  volume  before  consumption  by  fish.
 -  Can  be  used  as  a  Drug  Delivery  System  in  times  of  need.
 
 Always  make  it  a  habit  to  thoroughly  wash  your  hands  before  and  after  feeding  your  fish.  It  will  prove  to  be  beneficial  for  both  in  the  long  run.  
 
 While  we  are  at  feeding,  let  me  mention  an  interesting  and  funny  observation  of  a  Flowerhorn's  feeding  behaviour  and  the  display  of  possessiveness  and  ego.  Most  of  my  fish  displayed  this  at  one  point  of  time  or  another.  It  is  primarily  displayed  when  the  regular  feeder  ignores  the  fish's  feeding  requests.  You  must  be  bonded  with  the  fish  before  the  fish  displays  it.  It  is  also  displayed  in  response  to  perceived  favoritism  by  the  master  towards  another  flowerhorn.  This  results  from  possessiveness  resulting  from  the  close  bond  between  flowerhorn  and  master.
 -  You  know  that  a  Flowerhorn  is  hungry  when  the  fish  follows  you  around  the  room  and  begs  you  for  food  by  making  biting  actions,  and  rapid  to  and  fro  movements  by  wagging  its  tail.  
 -  If  you  ignore  these  requests  repeatedly  or  aren't  paying  attention  to  these,  the  fish  starts  splashing  water.
 -  If  you  ignore  these  desperate  attempts  too,  the  flowerhorn  stops  all  actions  and  constantly  keeps  staring  at  you  for  hours  on  end  till  you  go  near  his  tank  and  try  to  feed  him.  But  instead  of  responding  to  you,  the  fish  retreats  to  the  furthest  corner  of  the  tank  from  you  and  refuses  to  eat  for  quite  a  long  time.  This  is  his  style  of  frowning.  Similar  behaviour  may  also  be  displayed  when  you  have  another  flowerhorn  in  plain  sight  of  the  first  and  you  happen  to  feed  him  first.
 
 If  and  when  you  observe  the  above  behaviour  from  your  flowerhorn,  know  that  you  have  bonded  with  him  in  a  Father-son  like  relationship  and  your  little  actions  matter  a  lot  to  him.  
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=269273&highlight=#269273
 
 
 
 
 Weekly  fasting  of  Flowerhorns
 Posted  on  Mon  Oct  31,  2011  3:58  pm
 
 Here's  my  take  on  fasting  and  changes  in  feeding  according  to  the  growth  stage.  
 
 Fasting  fish  during  the  growth  phase  is  not  recommended  by  me.  
 It  is  wiser  to  add  fibre  rich  feed  to  the  existing  regimen  rather  than  fasting.  Hikari  offers  a  wide  range  of  fibre  rich  feed  for  cichlids.  
 Once  the  flowerhorn  reaches  around  8  to  10  inches  and  its  growth  slows  down,  the  feeding  must  be  marginally  reduced  in  both  quantity  and  frequency.  
 The  alternatives  to  normal  frequency  voracious  feeding  at  this  stage  are:  
 1)  Once/Twice  a  day  feeding  7  days  a  week.  
 2)  Normal  frequency  5  days  a  week  with  48  hour  continuous  fasting.  
 3)  Normal  frequency  on  alternate  days.  
 (  *  Normal  Frequency  =  Same  frequency  as  in  the  growth  phase.  It  varies  with  every  fish  and  owner.  It  is  what  the  individual  fish  is  used  to.  )
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=266907&highlight=#266907
 
 
 
 
 Regarding  Weaning  Flowerhorns  off  live  food,  siphoning,  partitioning  and  substrate  for  Flowerhorn  Aquaria
 Posted  on  Thu  Nov  10,  2011  3:24  am
 
 If  your  flowerhorn  isn't  accepting  pellets,  do  the  following:
 -  Buy  some  premium  carnivore  pellets  or  sticks.  If  azoo  flowerhorn  pellet  or  arowana  stick  10g  sachet  is  available,  get  it.  Or  go  for  any  other  branded  product  like  hikari/ocean  free/grand  sumo,  etc.  These  have  less  fillers  and  more  amount  of  proteinaceous  content.  These  have  greater  palatability  and  so  are  highly  recommended.
 -  Wet  a  single  pellet/stick  or  a  broken  piece  of  it  for  about  2-5  minutes,  before  feeding  it  to  your  fish.  By  moistening,  the  pellet  softens,  which  is  easy  to  bite  and  is  more  palatable.
 -  Let  the  flowerhorn  spot  it/taste  it/  eat  it/  spit  it.  Be  patient.  Wait  and  observe.  Many  flowerhorns  have  a  habit  of  spitting  out  food  and  eating  it  off  the  bottom  later.  If  the  pellet  gets  eaten,  feed  more  in  the  same  manner  one  by  one.  If  he  spits  it  out,  check  from  time  to  time  whether  he  has  eaten  it.  Feed  no  more  until  he  eats  it.  If  he  hasn't  eaten  it  by  the  end  of  the  day,  siphon  it  out  and  let  the  fish  starve  for  the  night.
 -  Repeat  the  above  procedure  the  next  day.  you  can  do  this  for  4-5  days  at  a  stretch.  If  he  remains  adamant  till  the  6th  day,  feed  him  the  bloodworms  or  any  feed  that  he  readily  accepts.  Do  so  for  the  next  couple  of  days.  then  again  repeat  the  4-5  day  starving  regimen.
 -  Usually  flowerhorns  don't  wait  that  long.  They  usually  crack  within  the  first  3  days.
 
 Siphonig  out  the  excess  wastes  from  the  bottom  and  toppng  up  (  replacing  )  the  water  (  therefore  technically,  not  WC  but  WR  or  water  replacement  )  is  a  good  practice  and  benefits  in  the  log  run.  It  doesn't  take  up  more  than  5-10  minutes  of  your  time  every  night  or  whenever  possible.  I  highly  recommend  it.  And  what  better  tank  to  do  this  than  a  barebottom?
 
 If  you  decide  to  use  fine  soft  sand  as  substrate  this  is  how  you  conduct  the  siphoning
 -Cut  the  bottom  off  a  200-500ml  plastic  bottle  at  a  5-10%  angle.  
 -Drill  out  a  hole  in  the  lid  of  the  diameter  of  your  siphon  tube.  
 -pass  1  inch  of  the  tube  through  it.  
 -Glue  it  up  to  make  it  airtight.  
 -Now  siphon  out  the  poop  by  sifting  the  sand  in  a  cyclical  motion.  
 -Since  the  poop  and  wastes  are  lighter,  they  get  sucked  out,  while  the  heavier  sand  settles  back  to  the  bottom.  
 -You  need  a  little  practice  to  master  it.  
 -Its  a  little  bit  time  consuming  at  first,  but  once  you  get  the  air  of  it,  you'll  sort  of  love  doing  it.
 
 I  have  grown  out  flowerhorns  in  partitioned  2  footers  earlier  (  3  juvies  per  two  footer  ).  They  had  excellent  growth  and  development  and  were  a  healthy  lot.  All  of  them  developed  koks  including  the  females.  The  extras  among  those  were  later  gifted  to  friends  at  6  inches  or  so.  My  current  flowerhorns,  ADOLF  and  RUDOLPH  are  being  grown  out  in  a  50  Gallon  partitioned  3  footer.  You  can  see  their  growth  in  their  respective  threads.  Only  one  of  them  will  get  to  keep  the  entire  tank  eventually  though.  So  the  the  answer  to  your  partitioning  querry  is  YES.
 
 Use  a  mesh  for  partitioning  rather  than  glass/acrylic.  Having  a  free  flow  of  water  between  the  two  sides  has  many  benefits.  
 -  Though  it  acts  as  a  physical  barrier  for  the  fish,  it  doesnot  hamper  the  flow  of  nutrients  and  wastes.  Thus,  by  chemical  parameters,  both  fish  get  to  utilize  the  entire  volume  of  water  rather  than  only  half  of  it.  
 -  You  need  only  one  aerator  and  only  one  filter.
 -  Siphoning  out  wastes  and  topping  up  the  water  also  neednot  be  done  separately.
 -  The  fish  get  to  room  in  better  with  each  other.
 *  use  the  greatest  mesh  size  according  to  the  size  of  your  fish.  I  keep  two  to  three  partitions  ready  with  different  mesh  sizes  (  8  mm,  15  mm  and  1  inch  ).  As  my  fish  grow,  I  replace  the  partitions  in  increasing  order  of  mesh  size.  Greater  is  the  mesh  size,  less  hampered  is  the  flow  of  water  through  it  and  thus,  better  is  the  filtration.
 
 FH  are  kept  both  in  barebottoms  and  substrated  tanks.  I  prefer  a  barebottom  since  it  makes  siphoning  easier,  is  easier  to  maintain  and  hosts  no  sites  for  colonization  by  pathogens.
 
 It  you  are  planning  to  add  substrate  and  other  decor,  keep  the  following  in  mind
 -  don't  use  sharp  chips/decor.
 -  know  that  flowerhorns  dig  a  lot.
 -  there  have  been  a  few  threads  posted  by  members  of  Flowerhornusa.com  wherein  the  fish  ingested  a  piece  of  gravel  causing  intestinal  obstruction  leading  to  herniation,  prolapse  and  death.  You  may  browse  these  to  note  their  experiences.  I  remember  one  thread  posted  in  round  July  2008  wherein  the  hobbyist  manually  removed  the  stone  by  taking  an  incision  on  the  constriction  ring  of  the  prolapsed  anus.  He  posted  photographs  of  the  entire  procedure.  The  fish  survived  then,  but  for  how  long,  I  know  not.
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=267919&highlight=#267919
 
 
 
 
 Treatment  of  Genital/Rectal  Prolapse  in  Flowerhorns
 Posted  on  Thu  Aug  25,  2011  7:56  pm
 
 In  an  anatomical  disorder  like  hernia  or  Rectal/Genital  prolapse,  the  inflammation  or  swelling  must  be  dealt  with  before  manual  reduction  is  attempted.  This  swelling  might  be  due  to  venous  congestion  or  secondary  infection.  In  any  case,  Metronidazole  will  prove  beneficial.  Make  atleast  33%  water  changes  daily.  Add  modest  amount  of  salt  to  the  water  after  every  change.  After  a  couple  of  days,  if  the  swelling  has  reduced,  manual  reduction  can  be  attempted  with  gentle  pressure,  using  a  sterile  ear-bud,  a  little  at  a  time.
 Check  with  your  local  LFS  for  the  medication  and  you  will  find  the  dosage  information  on  the  label.  
 
 I  use  medical  grade  Metronidazole  solution  intended  for  I.V.  or  topical  use  for  instillation.  For  external  injuries  or  open  lesions,  I  use  metronidazole  Ointment,  that  I  apply  using  a  sterile  earbud,  holding  the  fish  in  a  tub  fill  of  shallow  water,  every  12  hourly,  till  inflammation  subsides.  I  have  never  used  aquarium  grade  solution  since  the  medical  grade  medication  is  always  available  with  me.  
 
 Another  method  is  adding  Potassium  Permanganate  (  KMnO4  )  to  the  aquarium  water  in  the  cocentration  of  approximately  4  grains  per  litre  of  water  or  one  tiny  pinch  per  Gallon  of  water.  
 
 If  the  swelling  doesnot  reduce  within  2  days,  application  of  Magnesium  Sulphate  dressings  (  prepere  a  saturated  solution  of  Magnesium  Sulphate  aka  Epsom  in  Glycerine  and  apply  it  on  the  Prolapsed  area  using  a  sterile  ear-bud,  holding  the  fish  inverted  and  semi-submerged  in  a  water  bath,  using  a  soft  wet  cloth  for  2  -3  sittings  of  3  minutes  each.  Repeat  the  procedure  3  times  a  day.  All  the  necessary  medications  are  available  in  your  nearest  medical  store  over  the  counter.  )  
 
 You  may  use  my  methods  (  which  are  based  on  the  treatment  of  human  genital  /  rectal  prolapse  )  or  follow  the  ones  recommended  for  Aquarium  fish.  Both  work.  
 
 Once  the  swelling  subsides,  the  prolapsed  viscera  might  spontaneously  retract  or  might  require  gentle  manual  reduction.  
 
 PREVENTIVE  MEASURES  
 Humpy  head  alone  is  not  recommended  for  any  fish.  It  is  overstuffed  with  lipids  and  proteins  and  low  on  fibre,  leading  to  constipation.  I  am  not  aware  of  the  contents  of  Tetra  Bits.  
 In  order  to  prevent  future  relapses,  add  some  balanced  food  like  Hikari  Cichlid  staple  or  certain  algae  based  food  along  with  vitamin  supplements  to  the  fish's  diet.  More  fibre  in  her  diet  will  prevent  constipation.  Weekly  30%  water  changes  will  ensure  a  pathogen  free  and  clean  environment  for  the  fish.  Adding  salt  to  the  water  (  about  1/2  tsp  per  Gallon  )  is  highly  beneficial  as  most  freshwater  pathogens  are  intolerant  to  even  a  slight  increase  in  salinity.  
 
 
 Glossary  
 
 Empirical  Treatment  =  Secondary  prophylactic  treatment  usually  with  a  broad  spectrum  antibiotic  /  antiviral  /  antihelminthic  /  antiprotozoal  agent  before  the  exact  diagnosis  is  confirmed.  It  ensures  that  we  don't  waste  time  in  determining  the  illness,  while  the  infection  /  infestation  progresses.  eg.  The  initial  drug  therapy  administered  to  a  patient  while  awaiting  the  Lab  reports.  
 
 Instillation  =  Local  application  of  a  solution  using  a  dropper,  eg.  occular  ,  nasal  or  aural  drops.
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=258446&highlight=#258446
 
 
 
 
 Treatment  of  Third-Degree/Complete  Rectal/Intestinal  Prolapse
 Posted  on  Sun  Nov  27,  2011  2:58  am
 
 A  third  degree  rectal  prolapse  is  caused  by  chronic  constipation  alone  or  along  with  congenital  malformations  leading  to  weak  or  aberrant  muscular  attachment.  
 
 Keep  the  fish  in  a  well  aerated  medicated  bath  containing  non-iodized  salt  and  flagyl  (metronidazole)  (recommended)  or  methylene  blue  for  a  week.  Donot  feed  the  fish  during  this  period.  Siphon  out  the  wastes  daily,  and  top  up  the  water  and  medication.  Even  if   there  are  no  wstes,  carry  out  a  daily  30-35%  water  change  with  medicine  top  ups.  At  the  beginning  of  the  treatment,  record  the  length  and  girth  of  the  prolapsed  part.  Make  a  concentrated  solution  of  magnesium  sulfate  in  glycerine.  Remove  the  fish  out  af  the  water  using  a  soft  cotton  cloth  soaked  in  the  medicated  water  and  invert   it  to  expose  the  affected  area.  Soak  a  cotton  ball  in  the  magsulf  solution  and  apply  it  to  the  prolapsed  part  for  30  seconds  and  release  the  fish  back  into  the  bath.  repeat  this  after  a  2  minute  interval.  Conduct  this  cycliclly  for  5  times  in  a  sitting.  Conduct  3-4  such  sittings  per  day  during  this  7  day  period.  At  the  end  of  the  seventh  day,  note  whether  the  prolapsed  part  has  reduced  in  length  and  girth.  
 -If  the  only  the  girth  has  reduced,  you  may  attempt  to  gently  reduce  (gently  push  inside)  the  contents  after  application  of  glycerine.  Do  this  little  by  little  everyday,  until  it  is  completely  reduced.  
 -If  the  length  has  reduced,  it  means  that  the  prolapsed  intestine  is  reducing  spontaneously.  No  need  of  manual  reduction  in  this  case.  Just  continue  the  treatment  in  the  same  way  till  full  reduction  is  achieved.  
 -If  there  is  no  change  or  increase  in  the  length  and/or  girth  of  the  prolapse,  continue  the  treatment  for  another  week  with  small  feedings  of  fibre  rich  pellets.  If  still,  the  results  are  negative,  let  nature  take  it  from  there.  
 
 To  prevent  this  in  the  future,  provide  the  fish  with  fibre  rich  pellets.  A  protein  predominant  diet  leads  to  constipation  and  flatulence.  Maintaining   good  protein  to  fibre  ratio  in  the  diet  prevents  this.  
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=27209
 
 
 
 
 Treatment  of  Hole  In  The  Head  (HITH)/  Head  and  Lateral  Line  Erosion  (HLLE)/Hexamita  Infestation  in  Fowerhorns
 Posted  on  Sun  Oct  02,  2011  5:21  pm
 
 The  causes  of  HITH/HLLE  is  infection  by  the  parasite  hexamita,  along  with  immunocompromise,  most  likely  caused  by  vitamin/mineral  deficiency  and  bad  water  parameters.  There  might  also  be  another  secondary  infection.
 Isolate  the  fish  in   smaller  barebottom  tank  /  tub  /  bucket  half  full  of  water.
 Aerate  the  water  heavily  using  fresh  airstone.
 Add  aquarium/non-iodized  salt  in  the  concentration  range  of  1tsp  per  10  -  15  litres  (  no  need  to  exceed  1  tsp  /  5l  ).
 Add  a  metronidazole  based  solution  in  the  directed  concentration.
 If  you  have  a  heater,  set  the  thermostat  between  the  range  of  28.8  to  30  degree  celsius.
 Siphon  out  all  the  wastes  everyday  with  10  -  15  %  WC.
 Stop  all  feeds  for  24  -  48  hours.  
 Resume  feeding  with  high  quality  cichlid  pellets  or  pellets  /  tetra  bits  (  whatever  is  accepted  )  soaked  initially  in  a  concentrated  solution  of  Multivitamins.
 If  pellet  food  is  not  accepted,  try  clean  and  boiled  shrimp  soaked  in  multivitamins  or  disease  free  live  fish  (  stuff  the  feeder  fish's  moth  with  half  a  tablet  or  a  half  emptied  capsule  of  multivitamins.).  A  single  dose  regimen  is  sufficient.
 Your  friend  will  be  ok  in  a  week  if  all  goes  well.
 Clean  and  sundry  her  original  tank  thoroughly  along  with  all  substrate,  decor  and  filter  media,  before  introducing  her  back.
 If  possible,  keep  her  in  a  barebottom  with  weekly  siphoning  and  WC.  Good  quality  pellets  are  sufficient.  But  you  can  give  him  a  weekly  treat  of  cleaned  and  partially  boiled  shrimps/prawns.
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=263430&highlight=#263430
 
 
 
 
 Treatment  of   White  Spot/ICH/ICK/  Ichthyophthirius  multifiliis  Infestation  in  Flowerhorns
 Posted  on  Fri  Nov  18,  2011  3:49  pm
 
 Treat  all  your  fish  in  separate  hospital  tanks  (  an  ideal  hospital  tank  must  have  a  minimal  level  of  water  and  plenty  of  aeration.  The  level  of  water  in  a  well  aerated  hospital  tank  need  not  be  higher  than  3-4  times  the  depth  of  the  fish.  The  level  of  water  in  a  non-aerated  hospital  tank  need  not  be  more  than  twice  the  depth  of  your  fish.  The  low  volume  of  water  leads  to  less  wastage  of  medication.  ).  Treat  by  adding  non-iodized  salt  and  methylene  blue  or  Rid-all  Anti-ich  (  I've  had   100%  cure  rate  with  it  all  these  years.  And  almost  all  fish  I  have  bought  have  had  ich  in  the  LFS  but  never  in  my  tanks.).  You  may  alternatively  use  formalin  or  quinine  or  potassium  permanganate  or   malachite  green.  Don't  feed  the  fish  during  the  treatment  period.  Siphon  out  all  the  wastes  and  carry  out  water  and  medication  toppings  everyday  during  the  treatment  period.  You  may  use  heater  to  maintain  temperature  if  you  have  one  (raise  the  temperature  by  2  degrees  in  a  0.5  degrees  step  at  a  time,  not  to  exceed  30  degrees  centigrade)  or  a  60  watt  incandescent  bulb  will  suffice.  Continue  treatment  till  2  days  after  the  spots  disappear.  If  you  have  any  plecos  in  the  tank,  treat  them  too  in  the  same  fashion.   
 While  you  do  this,  clean  the  existing  tank,  any  decor  and  filter  media  thoroughly  by  scrubbing  with  salt.  Then  let  it  sundry  completely.  
 Adding  salt  to  the  water  (optional)  during  every  water  change  and  abstinence  from  live  feeding  are  the  best  preventive  measures  for  Ich  Infestation.
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=269170&highlight=#269170
 
 
 
 
 Diagnostic  Procedure  in  suspected  case  of  Foreign  Body  Ingestion
 Posted  on  Wed  Nov  23,  2011  9:41  pm
 
 You  will  need:  
 1)  A  bucket  filled  upto  6-7inches  with  dechlorinated  water,  containing  1  teaspoon  of  rocksalt  and  4  drops/liter  of  methylene  blue.  
 2)  A  soft  clean  cotton  cloth  or  an  old  cotton  vest.  
 3)  A  good  torchlight.  
 
 Procedure:  
 Fill  the  bucket  with  6-7inches  of  dechlorinated  water  such  that  the  fish  is  just  completely  submersible.  Add  1  teaspoon  of  noniodized  salt  and  4  drops  per  liter  of  methylene  blue.  Agitate  the  water  to  dissolve  all  contents  well.  Wait  for  10  minutes.  
 Get  someone  to  assist  you  in  the  procedure  if  possible.  
 Trim  your  nails.  Wash  and  scrub  your  hands  clean  upto  the  elbows.  
 Soak  the  clean  soft  cotton  cloth  with  the  water  in  the  bucket  and  use  it  while  handling  the  fish.  
 Now  remove  the  fish  gently  into  the  bucket  and  wait  for   couple  of  minutes.  
 
 Now  using  the  soaked  cloth,  remove  the  fish  out  of  the  water.  Using  a  tip  of  the  cloth  wrapped  around  your  finger,  open  the  fish's  mouth  to  the  full,  gently  and  shine  the  torch  into  its  depths.  Inspect  the  entire  cavity,  especially,  the  furthest  part  and  see  whether  you  can  spot  any  impacted  gravel.  
 If  yes,  take  him  to  a  vet  or  attempt  to  remove  it  with  assistance,  using  a  pair  of  forceps  or  any  blunt  tipped  angular  probe,  carefully.  
 
 Next,  using  the  cloth,  remove  the  fish  out  of  the  water,  but  still  in  the  bucket  (  So  that  even  if  it  were  to  slip,  it  will  slide  smoothly  into  the  water  without  hurting  itself  )  and  turn  it  over.  Now  gently  squeeze  the  bulging  belly  from  one  side  at  a  time,  using  the  soft  part  of  your  fingertip.  The  pressure  should  be  gentle.  While  doing  so,  get  your  assistant  to  shine  the  torch  upon  the  anogenital  region  and  look  out  for  any  discharge  (like  clear  fluid  or  gas  or  poop  or  pus  )  or   herniation.  Ease  on  the  pressure  if  such  a  thing  occurs.  Feel  whether  you  can  feel  a  hard  lump  in  the  abdomen  at  any  point.  Do  this  in  a  intermittent  fashion  by  releasing  the  fish  back  in  the  water  at  30  second  intervals.  Palpate  the  entire  abdomen.  
 In  case  of  pus  or  white/bloody  discharge  or  gas,  treatment  with  metronidazole  (flagyl)  is  recommended  for  both  fish.  
 In  case  of  a  hard  lump,  consult  a  vet  or  wait  for  the  fish  to  naturally  vomit  out  or  pass  out  the  gravel.  But  the  chances  of  survival  in  this  case  are  faint.  
 
 After  the  procedure,  even  if  there  is  no  abnormality  detected,  keep  the  fish  in  this  medicated  and  aerated  bath  for  2  days  before  introduction  into  the  barebottom.  
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=269845#269845
 
 
 
 
 Metronidazole  (  Flagyl  )  treatment  tips
 Posted  on  Fri  Nov  25,  2011  10:28  pm
 
 As  of  November  2011:
 10  Tablets  (200mg)  cost  you  less  thn  5  bucks.  
 A  30ml  bottle  of  Flagyl  oral  Suspension  (  200mg/5ml  ie.  40mg/ml  )  won't  cost  you  more  than  10  bucks  in  any  Medical  store.  Shake  well  before  use.  
 IV  solution  is  available  in  100ml  bottles/bags  (  500mg/100ml  ie.  5mg/ml  )  and  won't  cost  you  more  than  20  bucks.  
 
 The  dosage  that  I  have  used  successfully  over  the  years  is  15-20mg/day  for  adult  fish  and  5-10mg/day  for  juvies.
 
 You  can  use  a  calibrated  dropper/needle-less  syringe  to  administer  approximately  20mg/day  of  the  suspension  orally,  for  7  days.  Just  make  sure  that  the  dose  is  delivered  deeper  than  the  gill  plates.  The  con  is  that  his  requires  daily  handling  of  the  fish.  
 
 Alternatively,  you  can  feed  the  fish  with  a  disease  free  feeder  fish,  who  is  stuffed  with  1/10th  portion  of   tablet  (euivalent  to  20mg)  for  adults  or  with  1/20th  portion  of   tablet  (euivalent  to  10mg)  for  juvies  every  day  for  7  days.  
 
 Alternatively,  you  can  soak  the  pellets  in  the  desired  volume  of  solution  (4ml  for  adults  and  2ml  for  juvies),  before  feeding  for  the  next  7  days.  The  con  is  that  the  fish  needs  to  accept  these.  
 
 Alternatively,  you  can  dissolve  the  solution  in  the  hospital  aquarium  water  at  the  concentration  of  1  ml  per  litre  for  the  next  10  days  (common  for  adults  and  juvies).  Max  dose  for  adults  is  8ml  (40mg)  per  litre,  to  be  used  only  in  refractory  cases.
 
 REF:  http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=27145&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=15


Last edited by TheChannaGuy on Mon Nov 28, 2011 2:45 pm; edited 18 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
ashwin1224
Regular Poster on IAH
Regular Poster on IAH



Joined: May 20, 2011
Posts: 805
Location: Nagpur

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 11:25 pm Post subject: Re: BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORNKEEPING (To be Edited) Reply with quote

 Surprised   Surprised   Surprised  
 
 That  is  one  hell  of  an  Article!!!
 Kudos  to  you  man!!!
 
 I  am  not  into  FH  keeping  but  still  gained  alot.
 A  few  questions  though,  why  is  a  Kok  called  a  Kok??
 Is  it  some  sort  of  abbreviation?  Or  it  means  something  in  some  asian  language?
 
 And  why  is  the  soft  hump  of  a  kamfa  lauded?
 It  is  a  tumerous  growth  and  it  could  be  causing  the  fish  intense  pain.  Some  of  these  growths  are  humongous!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Kastor48252
Regular Poster on IAH
Regular Poster on IAH



Joined: Dec 09, 2008
Posts: 655
Location: Mumbai Dahisar (w)

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 11:55 pm Post subject: Re: BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORNKEEPING (To be Edited) Reply with quote

 Thanks  for  your  help  Channa.  Kindly  edit  it  for  me.  I  have  mailed  you  the  script.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
ArowanaNewBe
IAH New Member
IAH New Member



Joined: Sep 22, 2011
Posts: 21
Location: Navi Mumbai

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 1:00 am Post subject: Re: BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORNKEEPING (To be Edited) Reply with quote

 Admins,
 
 Please  make  this  one  sticky.  It  will  be  easier  to  refer  in  case  of  any  doubt  in  day  to  day  maintenace.
 
 Thanks  for  hard  work.
 
 Regards,
 Ashish
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Rohit1076
Frequent Visitor to IAH
Frequent Visitor to IAH



Joined: Apr 04, 2011
Posts: 146
Location: Bangalore/Delhi

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 1:01 am Post subject: Re: BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORNKEEPING (To be Edited) Reply with quote

 Well!
 A  big  thanks  to  Channa  &  Kastor.  Guys  your  effort  &  time  is  really  appreciable  &  you  have  done  a  great  commendable  job........
 
   Clapping   Clapping   Clapping   Clapping
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Vicky01
Frequent Visitor to IAH
Frequent Visitor to IAH



Joined: Oct 23, 2009
Posts: 146
Location: Bengaluru

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 1:37 am Post subject: Re: BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORNKEEPING (To be Edited) Reply with quote

 This  is  brilliant!   Rock On   Rock On   Rock On  
 
 Hats  off  to  you,  Kastor!  And  thank  you,  TheChannaGuy  for  collating  all  of  this!
 
 I  had  kept  a  flowerhorn  a  long  time  ago.  Now  I'm  going  to  buy  one  at  the  next  available  opportunity.   Smile  
 
 Kastor,  I  have  a  couple  of  questions  about  the  pre-soaked  pellets:
 
 -  For  how  many  seconds  or  minutes  do  you  pre-soak  pellets  before  feeding  them  to  the  FH?  Do  you  use  the  same  pre-soak  time  for  all  types  of  pellets?
 
 -  What  size  pellets  do  you  feed  your  FH?
 
 Vicky
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
TheChannaGuy
Frequent Visitor to IAH
Frequent Visitor to IAH



Joined: Dec 16, 2010
Posts: 125
Location: Mumbai

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 2:08 am Post subject: Re: THE BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORN KEEPING Reply with quote

 Alas  my  work  here  is  done!  Thanks  to  you  guys  for  your  patience  and  support.  All  your  querries  will  be  answered  by  Kas  when  he  gets  back  online.   Wave
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Kastor48252
Regular Poster on IAH
Regular Poster on IAH



Joined: Dec 09, 2008
Posts: 655
Location: Mumbai Dahisar (w)

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 3:04 am Post subject: Re: THE BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORN KEEPING Reply with quote

 @  Channa
 You  have  far  exceeded  my  expectations  Bro.  You're  in  for  a  treat.
 
 @  Ashwin,  Ashish,  Rohit,  Vicky
 Thanks  for  your  valued  appreciation.  Do  add  your  experiences  to  this  thread  in  the  future.
 
 @  Ashwin
 From  what  I  have  read,  "Kok"  is  one  of  the  Cantonese  words  for  "Horn".
 Agree  about  the  ugliness  of  the  humongous  and  tumourous  koks  on  some  fish.  But  the  naturally  huge  ones  might  not  be  painful.  Just  an  obstruction  to  fast  and  graceful  swimming  and  a  blind  area  in  the  visual  field.  It  is  the  injected  ones  that  cause  pain.
 These  huge  koksters  are  in  demand  since  they  are  associated  by  profit  mongerers  to  Chinese  lore.  The  kok  is  considered  to  be  a  sign  of  prosperity  and  longevity  by  associating  it  with  the  hunchback  of  the  respective  Chinese  God.  So  larger  koks  are  highly  valued  in  the  orient.
 In  India,  some  Feng  Shui  practitioners  recommend  intensely  red  Flowerhorns  with  huge  koks.
 Owning  a  huge  koked  flowerhorn  is  also  considered  as  a  status  symbol  by  some,  due  to  the  obviously  high  price-tag  associated  with  it.
 
 @  Rohit
 You  are  our  future  King  Kamfa  expert  bro.  Hone  your  skills  while  there  is  time.  You  will  be  plagued  by  King  Kamfa  related  querries  in  a  matter  of  months.
 
 @  Vicky
 Welcome  back  to  the  club  bro.  
 It  takes  about  3-5  minutes  to  soak  the  pellets  of  all  types  completely.  
 The  protein  rich  pellets  soften  faster.  The  fibre  rich  pellets  take  a  little  longer.  But  waiting  for  5  minutes  gets  them  all  ready  for  consumption.
 The  size  of  pellets  depends  on  the  size  of  your  fish's  mouth.  But  it  also  depends  on  availability.  
 I  currently  use  medium  sized  pellets.  once  my  fish  cross  the  six  inch  mark,  I  will  buy  large  sized  pellets.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Nick993
Regular Poster on IAH
Regular Poster on IAH



Joined: Aug 15, 2011
Posts: 746
Location: Mysore,Karnataka

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 8:57 am Post subject: Re: THE BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORN KEEPING Reply with quote

 Wonderful  Channa  Guy  and  Kastor!
 
 For  guys  like  me  with  a  dozen  questions,  its  really  Helpful!!   Clapping
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Vicky01
Frequent Visitor to IAH
Frequent Visitor to IAH



Joined: Oct 23, 2009
Posts: 146
Location: Bengaluru

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 5:09 pm Post subject: Re: THE BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORN KEEPING Reply with quote

 Thanks,  Kastor!  I  know  that  I  will  have  more  questions  for  you  in  the  near  future.  :)
 
 Vicky
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ashwin1224
Regular Poster on IAH
Regular Poster on IAH



Joined: May 20, 2011
Posts: 805
Location: Nagpur

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 7:50 pm Post subject: Re: THE BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORN KEEPING Reply with quote

 Sticky  it  please!!!  Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
nandy
Regular Poster on IAH
Regular Poster on IAH



Joined: May 19, 2011
Posts: 1262
Location: Bengaluru

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 8:48 pm Post subject: Re: THE BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORN KEEPING Reply with quote

 Well  done  guys  Clapping  ..
 admins,  please  make  it  "sticky"....
 
 Kastor  :  U've  made  Balaji's  dream  come  true  ROFL   ROFL  ,,  Excellent  work..  The  knowledge  you  have  on  FHs  is   awesome..   Rock On   Rock On
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Eemakoochi
Frequent Visitor to IAH
Frequent Visitor to IAH



Joined: Aug 10, 2011
Posts: 241
Location: Manchester of the South India - Cotton City - Coimbatore

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 12:13 am Post subject: Re: THE BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORN KEEPING Reply with quote

 Wonderful  Effort  by  ChannaGuy  to  gather  and  help  out  to  collate  all  the  sorted  information   Rock On  
 
 Kastor,  You  are  amazing,  i  think  that  it  might  take  up  me  couple  of  days  to  read  this  article  as  a  whole..  But  anyway  Excellent  Write  ups  and  knowledge  dude..  Expecting  lot  more  information  and  updates  in  coming...  In  the  meanwhile  i  hope  your  Rudie  and  Adie  (  ROFL  )  might  become  a  famous  specimen  like  Football  Predictor  Octopus  ,  teach  them  some  kind  of  tricks  and  unreal  a  new  character  out  of  your  Flowerhorns   ...  Dancing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
rocky2
Committed Member of IAH
Committed Member of IAH



Joined: Apr 29, 2010
Posts: 1852
Location: noida (up) sec 55

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 1:03 am Post subject: Re: THE BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORN KEEPING Reply with quote

 awwsum  dude  for  this  nice  writeup  it  because  of  people  like  u  due  to  which  newbies  can  learn  things  and  stick  to  flowerhorn  keeping..and  hope  someday  people  would  keepfh  as  pets  and  not  as  items  and  so  called  fh  haters  would  like  them  because  as  its  mentioned  hybridization  also  happens  in  nature  but  on  a  smaller  scale.....i  love  fh  just  because  of  there  personality  and  beauty
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Mridul
Regular Poster on IAH
Regular Poster on IAH



Joined: Feb 16, 2010
Posts: 378
Location: Kolkata

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 11:08 pm Post subject: Re: THE BIG THREAD OF FLOWERHORN KEEPING Reply with quote

 Awsome  thread  Kastor.....  Clapping   Clapping  And  I  also  appreciate  the  amount  of  work  done  by  TheChannaGuy.  Kudos  to  you  people......  Administers  its  a  request,  please  make  it  sticky  Very Happy  
 
 
                                                 
ashwin1224  wrote  (View  Post):                
Surprised   Surprised   Surprised  
 
 That  is  one  hell  of  an  Article!!!
 Kudos  to  you  man!!!
 
 I  am  not  into  FH  keeping  but  still  gained  alot.
 A  few  questions  though,  why  is  a  Kok  called  a  Kok??
 Is  it  some  sort  of  abbreviation?  Or  it  means  something  in  some  asian  language?
 
 And  why  is  the  soft  hump  of  a  kamfa  lauded?
 It  is  a  tumerous  growth  and  it  could  be  causing  the  fish  intense  pain.  Some  of  these  growths  are  humongous!                

 
 Hey  Ashwin,  nice  signature  mate.....  I  coudn't  gaze  upon  your  texts,  the  sig.  is  surely  an  eye-catcher  Chuckle
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:
Post new topic  Reply to topic   printer-friendly view http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/ Forum Index ->  Cichlids All times are UTC + 5.5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You cannot download files in this forum




Powered By: phpBB © 2001 - 2006 phpBB Group
Nuke-Evo Conversion By: Evo-Themez | iCGstation v1.0 Template By Ray


[News Feed] [Forums Feed] [Downloads Feed] [Web Links Feed] [Validate robots.txt]


Forum Modification Pack by Revolution-Mods.

PHP-Nuke Copyright © 2006 by Francisco Burzi.
All logos, trademarks and posts in this site are property of their respective owners, all the rest © 2006 by the site owner.
Powered by Nuke-Evolution
[ Page Generation: 6048 Seconds | Memory Usage: 3.48 MB | DB Queries: 134 ]

Do Not Click