Home
Home
Forums
Forums
Downloads
Downloads
Account
Account
Aquatic Gardeners Association
Main Menu   
 
HomeHome  
    Home
Community  
    Forums
    FAQ
    Content
    Gallery
    Reviews
    Surveys
    Topics
Members  
    Private Messages
    Your Account
    Profile
    Members List
Statistics  
    Statistics
Files & Links  
    Downloads
    Web Links
News  
    News
    Submit News
Other  
    Advertising
    Shout Box
    Site Map
    Recommend Us
    Feedback
    Legal Notices


User Info   
 
Good evening 
Anonymous



Register
Lost Password
Username
Password

 Online:   
Member(s):

Guest(s):
01. Guest
02. Guest
03. Guest
04. Guest
05. Guest
06. Guest
07. Guest
08. Guest
09. Guest
10. Guest
11. Guest
12. Guest
13. Guest
14. Guest
15. Guest
16. Guest
17. Guest
18. Guest
19. Guest
20. Guest
21. Guest
22. Guest
23. Guest
24. Guest
25. Guest
26. Guest
27. Guest
28. Guest
29. Guest
30. Guest
31. Guest
32. Guest
33. Guest
34. Guest
35. Guest
36. Guest
37. Guest
38. Guest
39. Guest
40. Guest
41. Guest
42. Guest
43. Guest
44. Guest
45. Guest
46. Guest
47. Guest
48. Guest
49. Guest
50. Guest
51. Guest
52. Guest
53. Guest
54. Guest
55. Guest
56. Guest
57. Guest
58. Guest
59. Guest
60. Guest
61. Guest
62. Guest
63. Guest
64. Guest
65. Guest
66. Guest
67. Guest
68. Guest
69. Guest
70. Guest
71. Guest
72. Guest
73. Guest
74. Guest
75. Guest
76. Guest
77. Guest
78. Guest
79. Guest
80. Guest
81. Guest
82. Guest
83. Guest
84. Guest
85. Guest
86. Guest
87. Guest
88. Guest
89. Guest
90. Guest
91. Guest
92. Guest
93. Guest
94. Guest
95. Guest
96. Guest
97. Guest
98. Guest
99. Guest
100. Guest
101. Guest
102. Guest
103. Guest
104. Guest
105. Guest
106. Guest
107. Guest
108. Guest
109. Guest
110. Guest
111. Guest
112. Guest
113. Guest
114. Guest
115. Guest
116. Guest
117. Guest
118. Guest
119. Guest
120. Guest
121. Guest
122. Guest
123. Guest
124. Guest
125. Guest
126. Guest
127. Guest
128. Guest
129. Guest
130. Guest
131. Guest
132. Guest
133. Guest
134. Guest
135. Guest
136. Guest
137. Guest
138. Guest
139. Guest
140. Guest
141. Guest
142. Guest
143. Guest
144. Guest
145. Guest
146. Guest
147. Guest
148. Guest
149. Guest
150. Guest
151. Guest
152. Guest
153. Guest
154. Guest
155. Guest
156. Guest
157. Guest
158. Guest
159. Guest
160. Guest
161. Guest
162. Guest
163. Guest
164. Guest
165. Guest
166. Guest
167. Guest
168. Guest
169. Guest
170. Guest
171. Guest
172. Guest
173. Guest
174. Guest
175. Guest
176. Guest
177. Guest
178. Guest
179. Guest
180. Guest
181. Guest
182. Guest
183. Guest
184. Guest
185. Guest
186. Guest
187. Guest
188. Guest
189. Guest
190. Guest
191. Guest
192. Guest
193. Guest
194. Guest
195. Guest
196. Guest
197. Guest
198. Guest
199. Guest
200. Guest
201. Guest
202. Guest
203. Guest
204. Guest
205. Guest
206. Guest
207. Guest
208. Guest
209. Guest
210. Guest
211. Guest
212. Guest
213. Guest
214. Guest
215. Guest
216. Guest
217. Guest
218. Guest
219. Guest
220. Guest
221. Guest
222. Guest

Most Ever Online:   
 Guest(s): 464
 Member(s): 16
 Total: 480

Forums Forums:   
 Posts: 339,824
 Topics: 30,770




http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/ :: View topic - the Estimative index
Forum Index  |  Search  |  Usergroups  |  Edit your profile  |  Members  |  Log in to check your private messages
Ranks  |  Staff  |  Statistics  |  Board Rules  |  Forum FAQ  |  Log in



the Estimative index
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic   printer-friendly view    http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/ Forum Index -> Macro and Micro Fertilisers
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
plantbrain
IAH New Member
IAH New Member



Joined: May 18, 2005
Posts: 14


Status: Offline
PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2005 10:35 pm Post subject: the Estimative index Reply with quote

 This  is  an  article  I've  written  and  many  of  you  here  know  about  it  already,  but  those  that  do  not,  you  will  find  it  most  helpful  in  dealing  with  algae  and  making  a  simple  routine  that  focuses  on  growing  plants.
 
 What  is  it?  
 
 The  Estimative  index  is  a  simple  method  to  dose  nutrients  for  any  tank  without  test  kits.  In  a  nut  shell,  the  aquarist  doses  frequently  to  prevent  anything  from  running  out  (plant  deficiency)  and  does  large  weekly  water  changes  to  prevent  any  build  up  (Plant  inhibition).  In  this  manner,  we  can  easily  maintain  a  close  approximation  or  an  â€œestimation  index”  of  the  nutrient  levels  during  the  week,  not  too  high,  not  too  low  and…..no  need  for  a  test  kit  because  the  accuracy  is  close  and  in  most  cases  closer  than  a  test  kit.  I’ve  done  numerous  test  runs  over  a  week  or  three  week  time  period  using  very  high  light  and  many  different  species  of  fast  growing  stem  plants.  This  will  give  an  assumed  â€œmaximum  uptake  rate”.  This  rate  is  important  in  setting  the  upper  limit  of  the  needs  of  the  plants.  Once  the  aquarist  knows  this  rate,  they  can  be  confident  that  they  are  not  going  to  run  out  of  any  nutrient  at  most  any  lighting  variable.  This  â€œrate”  of  uptake  or  dosing  is  what  is  truly  important  rather  than  maintaining  some  static  â€œresidual”  level.  A  stable  range  is  all  that's  needed  for  good  healthy  growth.  This  range  has  proven  to  be  quite  large  on  the  upper  limits.
 
 These  maximum  rates  are  also  variable,  but  the  rates  I  am  suggestion  are  only  a  guideline,  different  plants  and  different  set  ups  may  use  more,  but  the  plants  will  not  run  into  deficiencies  at  these  rates.  Plants  can  take  up  more  than  they  need  for  growth,  something  called  "luxury  uptake".  the  opther  issue  is  that  a  plant  might  be  starved  for  a  nutrient  and  the  uptake  rate  may  be  very  rapid  in  the  first  few  weeks  then  taper  off  later.
 
 Some  Typical  uptake  rates  at  high  light  and  CO2  levels  per  day(24  hours):
 NO3:  2-4ppm
 NH4:  0.1-0.6ppm(do  not  dose  NH4!It  will  cause  algae)
 PO4:  0.3-0.6ppm  
 
 These  rates  do  not  assume  that  you  will  show  deficencies  if  you  dose  less  than  this,  but  adding  more  than  these  rates  will  not  help  further  plant  health.  Basically,  it  is  extremely  unlikely  your  plants  will  ever  need  more  than  these  rates.  Adding  enough  nutrients  to  prevent  anything  from  becoming  deficient  is  the  goal,  not  precise  uptake  and  growth  requirements.  
 
 Note:these  ranges  and  test  in  this  article  used  Hach  or  Lamotte  test  kits  and  where  checked  against  known  standard  solutions.  Most  hobby  grade  cheap  test  kits  often  are  inaccurate  and  create  many  problems  for  aquarist.  While  some  may  work,  it  is  always  a  better  idea  to  check  the  test  kit  against  and  known  standard.  This  way  you  verify  the  accuracy  and  this  is  what  is  done  in  research  science.  Do  not  assume  that  a  test  kit  is  accurate.  
 
 The  need  for  such  precision  is  not  needed  as  plants  have  a  very  wide  range  of  nutrient  concentrations  that  are  above  the  deficeincy  level  before  excess  nutrients  level  become  promblematic.  
 
 I  truthfully  do  not  know  what  levels  of  NO3  and  PO4  for  example  cause  problems  for  plants  or  induce  algae  in  a  fully  planted  tank.  NO3  levels  above  40ppm  can  cause  fish  health  issues.  PO4  at  very  high  levels  can  influence  KH(above  5ppm-10ppm).
 
 Clearly  these  are  far  beyond  the  needs  of  plants  and  the  range  makes  for  a  very  large  target  to  dose  even  if  the  aquarist  is  off  by  a  factor  of  2X.
 
 Lighting  is  very  expensive  to  measure  correctly  in  an  aquarium.  It  is  one  of  the  biggest  unknown  variables  in  keeping  planted  tanks,  watts/gallon  does  not  tell  you  much,  but  rough  guides  are  fine  if  the  aquarist  maintain  the  CO2  and  nutrient  levels  well.  Dosing  can  be  done  using  dosing  pumps  if  the  aquarist  wishes,  but  it  is  relatively  easy  to  do  with  a  good  routine.  They  can  later  tailor  their  routine  to  add  â€œjust  enough”  and  further  maximize  their  nutrient  dosing  to  their  individual  tank’s  needs.  An  important  aspect  of  this  method  is  the  knowledge  that  excess  nutrients  do  not  cause  algae  blooms  as  so  many  authors  in  the  past  and  many  today  still  maintain  without  having  tested  this  critically  in  aquariums  with  a  healthy  plant  biomass.  It  is  a  welcomed  relief  knowing  that  â€œexcess”  phosphate,  nitrate  and  iron  do  not  cause  algae  blooms.  
 
 For  many  years  this  has  been  the  assumption  but  it  is  incorrect.  Ammonium(NH4+)  at  low  levels  have  been  the  primary  causative  agent  for  algae  blooms  in  terms  of  an  "excess"  nutrient.  This  is  why  a  planted  tank  using  CO2  with  moderate  to  high  lighting  cannot  have  enough  nitrogen  supplied  by  adding  progressively  more  and  more  fish  to  the  tank  without  getting  algae  blooms.  It  does  not  take  much  ammonium  to  cause  the  bloom.  If  you  add  NO3  from  KNO3  you  will  not  get  any  algae  bloom,  if  you  add  even  1/20th  of  the  ammonium  you  will  get  a  very  intense  algae  bloom.  This  test  can  be  repeated  many  times  and  ran  again  and  again  with  the  same  result.  Adding  NO3  will  not  induce  the  bloom.  
 
 With  the  exception  of  NH4  and  urea,  higher  levels  of  PO4  (phosphate),  K+,  potassium,  and  NO3  to  large  extent  as  well  (to  20-30ppm  or  so)  and  Fe  (iron)  can  be  maintained  without  any  negative  effects  even  at  extremely  high  light  wattages  (e.g.  5.5  w/gal  at  30cm  depth,  using  mirrored  reflectors,  U  shaped  power  compact  lamps).  
 
 The  reason  for  so  much  light  was  to  reduce  the  time  before  an  algae  bloom  would  occur  and  prevent  competition  for  light.  If  algae  was  to  occur  due  to  higher  nutrient  levels,  if  would  occur  when  the  light,  CO2  and  nutrients  were  non  limiting  for  both  sets  of  variables.  With  less  light,  down  to  a  point  (Light  compensation  point,  the  LCP),  we  can  assume  less  uptake  and  less  issue  maintaining  a  â€œstable  range”  of  nutrients.  It  is  much  more  difficult  to  tease  apart  the  relationships  when  the  rate  of  growth  is  slower  (e.g.  less  light),  it  takes  more  time  to  note  differences  in  plant  growth  and  places  less  stress/growth  rate  on  the  system.  It  also  reduces  error  since  the  uptake  rates  are  high  enough  to  get  good  test  kit  resolution  whereas  at  1.5-2.0w/gal  with  normal  Fluorescent  lights  it  takes  much  longer  for  5  ppm  of  NO3  to  be  removed.  Good  test  kits  like  Lamotte  were  used  also  to  increase  accuracy  in  the  results.  These  test  kits  were  tested  against  a  series  of  known  standards  to  confirm  the  accuracy.  In  this  manner  I  could  test  the  ideas  with  much  more  confidence.  If  I  chose  to  test  a  non  CO2  plant  tank,  this  would  have  taken  a  very  long  time  with  very  expensive  test  kits  and  methods.  Additionally,  many  of  the  nutrients  would  be  used  up  quickly  before  I  had  a  chance  to  measure  them.  
 
 Returing  back  to  non  CO2  planted  tanks  after  gaining  this  knowledge  at  high  light  and  CO2  enrichement  allows  some  fairly  good  predictions/correlations  of  uptake  rates  for  non  CO2  planted  tanks  as  well.  The  rate  of  uptake  is  reduced  due  to  less  light  and  less  CO2.  
 
 This  method  is  specific  for  CO2  enriched  systems  with  higher  light  but  works  even  better  with  lower  light  CO2  enriched  tanks  or  salt  water  and  other  tanks  needing  a  certain  amount  of  nutrients.  I  suggest  30ppm  of  CO2,  while  a  tank  with  2  w/gal  might  be  okay  with  15-20ppm,  many  with  power  compact  bulbs  and  reflectors  need  to  have  their  CO2  levels  higher,  20-30ppm  range  is  optimal  for  the  lighting  period.  This  was  found  by  adding  more  CO2  until  there  was  no  net  gain  in  plant  growth  while  keeping  the  nutrient  and  lighting  levels  consistent  during  the  testing  period.  Research  on  three  aquatic  weeds  showed  that  the  plants  will  reach  and  carbon  fixing  maximum  at  around  30ppm  of  CO2  no  matter  what  light  intensity  is  used  (Van  et  al  1976).  The  maximum  CO2  level  no  matter  what  light  set  up  you  might  have  is  about  30ppm  for  these  three  very  fast  growing  weeds,  which  we  can  assume  have  higher  CO2  needs/demand  than  slower  growing  aquarium  plants  subjected  to  less  intense  lighting  than  sunlight.  While  the  needs  of  some  plants  might  exceed  some  of  these  parameters,  it’s  very  unlikely  that  this  will  occur  and  I’ve  found  no  evidence  to  support  otherwise  having  grown  close  to  300  species  of  submersed  freshwater  aquatic  macrophytes.  The  CO2  level  is  enough  to  support  non  limiting  growth,  just  like  PO4,  NO3  and  traces.  So  in  a  sense,  CO2  is  over  dosed  since  it's  an  easier  target  to  hit  and  measure.  Adding  more  will  not  harm  plants  and  is  only  limited  by  fish  health  and  O2  levels.
 
 
 
 Tap  water  is  cheap  and  water  changes  take  less  time  than  the  testing  (salt  water  is  the  exception  perhaps,  salt  mixes  cost  a  fair  amount  money).  Water  changes  also  cost  less  than  test  kits/testing  and  are  more  fool  proof  method  of  estimating  the  nutrient  levels  in  your  planted  tank  when  dealing  with  NO3,  Fe  and  PO4.  It's  also  simpler  and  requires  less  knowledeg  of  chemistry  and  testing  against  known  standards.  Plants  are  most  often  starved  of  nutrients  and  inaccurate  test  kits  are  largely  responsible.  Many  people  feel  tap  is  unsuitable  for  plants,  this  is  simply  not  true.  Old  myths  still  abound  claiming  excess  PO4  in  tap  water  causes  algae,  this  has  clearly  been  shown  by  many  hobbyist  to  be  patently  false.  The  tap  water  has  nutrients  in  it,  then  you  do  not  have  to  dose  these  nearly  as  much,  this  is  actually  a  good  thing!  Why  take  something  out  and  then  add  it  back  again?
 
 Have  hard  water?  
 Great,  you  do  not  have  to  add  any  baking  soda  and  GH  builder  to  your  tank.  Adding  enough  GH  to  bring  the  levels  to  3-5  GH  degrees  will  address  higher  light  tank  needs  over  a  week's  time.  You  can  use  SeaChem  Equilibrium  for  this  or  a  mix  of  CaCl2  (or  CaSO4  although  it  is  not  as  easy  to  dissolve  into  water)  and  MgSO4  at  a  4:1  ratio  to  increase  GH.  You  can  add  this  without  knowing  what  your  GH  is  by  adding  1  degree's  worth  after  a  weekly  water  change  (or  slightly  less  with  less  frequent  water  changes)
 
 Plants  prefer  soft  water?  Not  so,  neither  myself  or  other  experience  aquarist  have  found  plants  that  are  soft  water  dependent,  although  there  may  be  an  exception  or  two  out  perhaps  300  species,  it  is  safe  to  say  that  plants  prefer  harder  water  and  there  is  research  to  show  this  is  true,  (Bowes  1985),  (T.  Barr,  C.  Christianson  observations  of  clear  hard  water  springs  in  Florida,  USA  and  in  Brazil).  
 
 
 â€¢  The  problem:  
 
 
 #1  Dosing.
 This  can  be  very  tricky  when  dealing  with  many  variables.  Often  the  suggestion  is  "buy  a  test  kit"  and  test  to  see  what  your  nutrient  levels  are.  This  works  well  for  CO2  (but  folks  should  double  check  to  be  sure  before  proceeding  on)  and  GH  but  the  other  nutrients  like  NO3,  K,  PO4,  iron  as  a  proxy  for  the  traces  are  more  problematic.  Often  times  the  poor  aquarist  chases  one  nutrient  to  the  next  and  spends  a  small  fortune  and  time  as  well  carefully  testing  each  week,  or  several  times  each  week  trying  to  figure  out  what  is  missing.  Generally  many  never  find  what  is  wrong  after  doing  all  that.  Simply  doing  a  large  water  change  removes  all  the  variables,  and  dosing  known  amounts  back  in  to  the  tank  of  the  nutrients  effectively  re  sets  the  tank  each  week.  Even  if  you  are  off  by  a  little,  you  do  not  have  to  worry  about  running  out  since  the  levels  I’ve  suggested  are  for  high  light  tanks  and  you  know  if  the  CO2  is  in  good  shape  there  is  no  fear  of  algae  from  these  levels  of  nutrients  in  the  water  column  either.  Knowing  this  allows  great  flexibility  and  a  very  simple  method  to  keep  a  fairly  constant  level  of  any  nutrients  in  your  tank  and  no  need  to  test.  You  can  guess  the  doses  for  the  reminder  of  the  week  and  then  repeat.  Chuck  Gadd's  dosing  calculator  works  well  for  the  chemistry  challenged  and  those  wanting  to  know  how  much  of  what  to  add.  See  here:  http://www.csd.net/~cgadd/aqua/art_plant_aquacalc.htm  
 
 There  is  no  hard  and  fast  rule  here  when  dosing  or  doing  50%  weekly  water  changes.  This  method  can  be  applied  to  water  changes  once  a  month  or  once  every  two  weeks,  better  more  consistent  results  will  be  obtained  when  doing  50%  weekly  water  changes,  but  a  well  run  tank  can  go  longer  without  a  water  change.  The  aquarist  can  note  plant  health  and  dose  slightly  less  as  they  gain  experience  of  their  individual  tank's  needs.  Many  people  do  not  mind  some  trade  off  for  less  maintenance  there.  
 
 2#  Testing.
 This  is  huge  issue  for  most  folks.  Test  kits  cost  as  much  as  a  filter  or  much  more  in  some  cases.  Some  folks  can  afford  nice  Lamott/Hach  kits,  most  cannot  nor  wish  to  invest  300$  in  this.  Cheaper  kits  are  not  offered  for  K.  NO3  kits  are  very  problematic  and  color  reading  scales  are  difficult  to  assess  with  cheaper  kits.  Some  folks  are  color  blind.  Many  folks  don't  ever  want  to  test  and/or  feel  there's  no  need  to  test.  I  could  not  get  some  hobbyist  to  ever  test  no  matter  what  I  told  them  to  do!  I  fell  into  that  group  for  many  years.  I  did  as  well  as  I  do  today  but  I  am  much  more  consistent  now  and  I  also  know  why  it  works!  I  know  the  rates  of  uptake  and  have  done  a  lot  of  testing  since  my  bad  old  days.  I  also  did  large  weekly  water  changes  so  if  I  messed  up  dosing,  I  always  reset  the  tank  each  week.  I  have  a  relative  simple  methodology  to  side  step  much  of  the  drudgery  especially  with  testing  iron  and  NO3.  At  issue  here  is  the  maintenance  of  the  nutrient  levels  within  a  certain  range.  The  focus  will  be  on  2  groups,  nitrate  (NO3),  phosphate  (PO4),  potassium  (K),  the  so  called  macro  nutrients  and  the  trace  elements  represented  by  iron  (Fe)  as  a  proxy  for  the  other  trace  elements  that  are  included  in  trace  nutrient  mixes.  Using  teaspoon  (Dry  powders)  and  milliliter  measurements  (liquid  solutions)  we  can  be  very  accurate.  
 
 
 â€¢  Perhaps  a  better  question  is  how  close  to  a  good  range  of  nutrients  do  we  have  to  be  to  have  excellent  plant  growth  and  no  algae?  
 
 
 
 â€¢  Using  an  "estimative  index"  the  accuracy  can  be  as  follows:  
 
 
 
 (+  or  -)  5ppm  of  CO2  is  fine  in  a  20-30ppm  range.
 (+  or  -)  1ppm  or  so  of  NO3  is  pretty  reasonable.
 (+  or  -)  2ppm  of  K+  is  pretty  reasonable.
 (+  or  -)  0.2ppm  of  PO4  is  pretty  reasonable  (?)
 (+  or  -)  0.1ppm  of  Fe  is  reasonable  (?)  
 
 
 
 CO2  range  20-30ppm
 NO3  range  5-30ppm
 K+  range  10-30ppm
 PO4  range  1.0-2.0  ppm
 Fe  0.2-0.5ppm  or  higher  (?)  
 GH  range  3  degrees  ~  50ppm  or  higher  
 
 â€¢  Note:
 PO4  and  Fe  are  two  nutrients  that  are  difficult  to  assess  without  first  assessing  the  other  nutrients.  If  the  NO3,  K,  and  CO2  are  in  good  shape,  you  can  add  a  fair  amount  of  these  within  a  wide  range.  I  have  added  to  almost  2ppm  of  PO4  consistently  week  after  week.  Plant's  response  is  incredible.  
 Green  spot  algae  has  never  been  an  issue  when  high  PO4  levels  are  maitained  even  under  high  light  with  Anubias.  Adding  traces  has  been  a  focus  for  me  lately.  Many  have  stuck  with  the  old  standby  of  a  residual  of  0.1ppm  of  iron.  Well  what  does  this  residual  tell  us?  Does  it  tell  us  what  is  available  to  the  plants?  Is  this  enough?  Do  higher  doses  cause  algae?  
 
 
 â€¢  Setting  up  a  test
 I  can  tell  from  my  own  experiences  that  high  levels  of  traces  (Fe)  have  in  no  way  contributed  to  any  algae  presence.  I  double  checked  the  other  nutrients  before  drawing  a  conclusion.  Few  hobbyists  and  it  seems  no  aquarium  companies  bothered  to  look  at  it  from  this  controlled  perspective.  In  order  for  the  aquarist  to  draw  a  conclusion  about  a  nutrient,  it  must  be  isolated  and  you  must  test  only  for  the  dependent  variable.  This  is  relatively  easy  using  the  Estimative  Index;  essentially  they  are  making  a  reference  solution  each  week  of  the  proper  nutrient  levels  and  guessing  closely  till  they  perform  another  water  change.  This  gives  the  aquarist  a  powerful  simple  and  easy  to  use  tool/method  to  provide  a  more  controlled  environment  without  nearly  as  much  work.  At  some  point  the  plants  will  not  take  up  any  more  traces.  Same  can  be  said  for  PO4.  Adding  more  simply  will  not  improve  plant  growth  any  further.  Many  plants  will  take  up  excess,  often  called  â€œluxury  uptake”  of  nutrients  like  PO4  and  NO3.  So  it  may  not  improve  growth  even  if  the  plants  are  taking  in  these  nutrients.  We  must  be  careful  not  to  assume  that  uptake=growth/need.  
 
 This  is  where  the  top  end  of  a  range  should  be.  No  need  to  waste  expensive  trace  nutrients.  Aquarists  that  have  had  issues  with  algae  prior  may  want  to  try  adding  the  PO4  and  then  adding  more  traces  in  conjunction.  This  works  well  even  at  the  very  high  light  levels.  If  an  algal  bloom  was  to  occur,  it  will  express  itself  more  rapid  and  intensely  at  higher  light.  I  had  been  dosing  large  amounts  of  traces  all  along  since  my  reference  sometime  ago  had  been  Karl  Schoeler's  0.7ppm  recommendation  and  I  felt  like  a  little  more  might  help  if  the  tank  was  doing  well  as  many  recommendations  seemed  middle  of  the  road.  Karen  Randall  has  suggested  a  number  of  aquarist  in  the  past  found  levels  of  CO2  higher  than  the  commonly  suggested  10-15ppm  of  CO2  although  few  have  come  forward  to  suggest  this  recently.  Although  I  had  tested  numerous  times  and  tried  to  look  for  some  correlation  with  the  test  kits  for  uptake,  I  became  less  focused  on  the  testing  aspect  and  came  up  with  what  I  think  is  a  better  method  for  the  traces.  I  still  contend  most  aquarist  under  dose  the  traces  a  great  deal.  I  was  never  scared  of  algae  blooms  due  to  in  large  part  all  the  battles  I’d  done  with  algae  in  the  past  and  then  went  on  to  study  and  induce  algal  cultures  in  marine  and  freshwater.  Few  hobbyists  are  willing  to  trash  their  tanks  to  figure  out  why  algae  are  really  there.  That  is  what  was  required  to  figure  out  what  causes  algae  and  then  this  process  must  be  repeated  to  make  sure  the  results  are  not  an  isolated  case  and  can  be  repeated  by  other  researchers  elsewhere.  Often  times,  we  only  test  after  the  algae  is  already  there,  often  missing  what  really  caused  the  algae  to  begin  with.
 
 
 â€¢  The  estimative  part:
 Aquarists  simply  add  a  set  amount  of  traces  to  a  known  volume  of  water  (mls/day/liter  of  tank  volume).  If  the  tank  has  less  plants,  low  light,  this  can/may  be  reduce  in  frequency  but  not  dosage.  A  similar  pattern  can  be  done  for  the  macro  nutrients.  In  this  manner  you  essentially  are  making  a  "reference  solution"  each  time  you  dose  and  you  assume  a  certain  amount  of  uptake  the  other  one  or  two  times  prior  to  making  a  large  water  change  at  week's  end.  If  you  have  low  plant  density  or  have  low  light  (two  watts  or  less  Normal  output  FL's)  you  can  get  by  on  once  a  week.  By  knowing  what  the  tap  water  is  comprised  of  and  giving  the  water  company  a  call  to  find  out  what  the  PO4,  NO3,  K,  and  Fe  levels  are,  you  can  replace  the  water  with  water  changes  and  use  plain  old  chemistry  or  Chuck's  calculator  to  figure  out  what  you  need  for  your  nutrient  levels  without  a  test  kit.  Even  if  you  are  off  a  little  that's  okay  (see  above's  pluses  and  minuses).  The  water  utility  will  have  some  variation  but  if  you  are  close  to  the  middle  ranges  it  should  still  come  out  fairly  close.  So  imagine  a  tank  where  you  don't  test  except  for  CO2  (pH  and  KH)  and  only  that  once  in  a  while.  Everything  grows  well.  No  guessing.  Sound  good?  The  results  certainly  are.  Tanks  never  seeing  any  algae  are  quite  common,  10  years  ago,  this  was  not  the  case.  
 
 
 
 Aquarists  have  tried  the  substrate  dosing  only  method  for  many  years  with  hit  and  miss  results.  Eventually  the  substrate  runs  out  of  the  nutrients,  then  the  plants  suffer.  While  you  can  either  tear  the  tank  down  and  start  completely  over  each  year  or  so,  or  re-enrich  the  tank,  you  generally  are  left  with  having  to  wait  till  something  goes  wrong  before  you  do  something  about  it  rather  than  keeping  a  close  level  maintained  like  the  water  column.  Some  tanks  with  moderate/low  light  and  good  fish  loads  can  support  the  plant’s  needs  without  adding  macro  nutrients  for  extended  periods  but  that  is  still  dosing,  just  the  rate  is  slow  enough  to  maintain  the  plant  needs  for  that  lighting/CO2  level,  but  the  algae  are  far  from  limited.  Anyone  with  a  bloom  that  has  tried  to  water  change  the  algae  away  knows  that  is  not  true.  The  other  issue  about  folks  that  often  do  not  add  macro  nutrients/traces  etc,  is  many  do  large  water  changes.  These  folks  often  do  not  know  what  their  tap  water  has  in  it.  If  it  is  rich  in  NO3  and  PO4  like  many  regions  of  the  USA  and  Europe,  then  each  week  they  do  a  large  water  change,  they  are  adding  nutrients  and  CO2.  People  wondered  why  my  plants  did  so  well  with  the  water  changes  I  did  each  week  and  when  they  tested  found  high  levels  of  PO4,  I  was  adding  KNO3  and  lots  of  traces  and  high  light  and  high  trace  dosing  and  had  no  algae  and  dramatic  plant  health  and  growth.  Several  methods  suggest  substrate  fertilization  in  the  start  up  phase  followed  after  a  peroid  of  a  few  months  of  slowly  adding  water  column  fertilizer.  Any  long  term  method  eventually  becomes  a  water  column  dosing  method  unless  the  substrate  is  re  enrcihed  or  torn  down  and  re  fertilized.  Substrate  nutriernt  content  is  extremely  difficult  to  measure  while  the  water  column  is  much  easier  to  measure  and  dose  consistently,  providing  a  more  stable  nutrient  level  for  the  plants.
 
 
 You  can  extend  this  method  out  to  include  all  the  other  nutrients  like  traces  and  PO4  even  KH  and  GH.  You  can  try  whatever  you  feel  is  "perfect"  for  plant  growth  and  experiment  around.  Good  sized  weekly  water  changes  are  an  excellent  way  to  do  this  and  avoid  build  up  and  any  **dosing**  errors  or  **testing**  errors.  Test  Kits  (good  ones)  are  not  cheap  and  many  are  too  inconsistent  or  do  not  want  to  be  bothered  to  use  them.  This  method  used  KNO3,  KH2PO4  and  Trace  mixes  and  you  can  use  a  variety  of  trace  mixes  to  try  out  your  own  routines.  KH2PO4  (Fleet  or  generic  enemas  can  be  substituted,  these  are  sodium  phosphate  based)  and  KNO3  are  very  cheap  and  traces  are  relatively  cheap  unless  you  have  a  very  large  tank,  there  are  cheap  dry  mix  traces  available  as  well.  The  good  thing  about  this  method  is  that  the  fertilizers  are  available  the  world  over,  cheap,  consistently  the  same,  not  brand  name  aquarium  products  and  thus  much  cheaper.  When  I  suggest  to  Wu  in  Singapore  to  dose  Â¼  teaspoon,  1.67  grams  of  KNO3,  he  can  dose  the  same  thing  I  use  here,  he  might  not  be  able  to  get  some  brand  I  like  here  of  some  aquarium  product.  So  this  method  can  be  used  the  world  over,  not  just  in  the  USA.  
 
 
 â€¢  A  typical  routine  for  a  high  light  tank  with  low  fish  load:
 Volume  80  liters  (20  gal  high  standard  tank)
 5.5  watts/  gal.  55watt  5000K/8800K  lamps
 CO2-25-30ppm  (I  turn  my  CO2  off  at  night)
 Canister  filter
 Flourite  (any  porous  iron  rich  material  will  do)  about  7-10cm  depth  
 
 
 â€¢  Dosing
 1/4  teaspoon  of  KNO3  3-4x  a  week  (every  other  day)
 1/16th-1/32nd  teaspoon  of  KH2PO4  3-4x  a  week  (every  other  day)
 Traces  added  on  off  days  as  the  macro  nutrients,  so  3x  a  week,  5mls  each  time.  
 SeaChem  Equilibrium  1/8  teaspoon  after  water  change.
 
 
 So  the  aquarist  dose  only  3  things  really,  KNO3,  KH2PO4  on  the  day  of  the  water  change  then  every  other  day  there  after,  traces  of  the  off  day  till  the  next  week  rolls  around.  Do  a  50-70%  water  change,  dose  the  macro  nutrients  back,  add  the  traces  the  following  day  and  repeat.  You  can  slowly  back  off  this  amount  till  you  notice  plant  growth  differences  to  tailor  your  individual  tank’s  need,  but  all  you  will  do  is  waste  some  macros  and  traces  by  adding  more  than  the  plant  needs.  You  should  give  each  change  in  your  routine  about  3  weeks  before  making  another  change.  This  will  take  time  but  is  worth  the  time  spent.  It  will  not  cause  algae  unless  you  over  look  something,  namely  CO2  or  under  dosing  KNO3  which  both  of  these  account  for  about  95%  of  all  algae  issues.  If  you  focus  on  the  plant’s  needs,  the  algae  will  no  longer  grow.  I  hope  this  helps  and  ends  much  frustration  for  the  aquatic  gardener  so  then  aquarist  may  focus  on  aquascaping  and  growing  plants  rather  than  asking  how  to  kill  algae.  
 
 The  aquarist  does  not  have  to  stick  with  merely  a  weekly  routine  with  the  water  changes  or  accept  50%  as  their  volumes.  
 This  will  level  off  the  dosing  at  2x  the  dosed  amount  so  that  nothing  will  ever  be  overdosed  beyond  2x  the  target  range.
 
 The  math  behind  this  is  as  follows:
 
 http://fins.actwin.com/aquatic-plan...1/msg00416.html  
 
 Additional  References:
 Bowes  G.  1991.  Growth  in  elevated  CO2:  photosynthetic  responses  mediated  through  rubisco.  Plant,  Cell  and  Environment,  14:  795-806  (invited  review)
 Madsen  TV,  Maberly  SC,  Bowes  G.  1996.  Photosynthetic  acclima-tion  of  sub-mersed  angio-sperms  to  CO2  and  HCO3-.  Aquatic  Botany,  53:  15-30
 Additional  reading:
 Canfield,  D.E.,  Jr.,  K.A.  Langeland,  M.J.  Maceina,  W.T.  Haller,  J.V.  Shireman,  and  J.R.  Jones.  1983.  Trophic  state  classification  of  lakes  with  aquatic  macrophytes.  Canadian  Journal  of  Fisheries  and  Aquatic  Sciences  40:1713-1718.
 Canfield,  D.E.,  Jr.,  J.V.  Shireman,  and  J.R.  Jones.  1984.  Assessing  the  trophic  status  of  lakes  with  aquatic  macrophytes.  pp.  446-451.  Proceedings  of  the  Third  Annual  Conference  of  the  North  American  Lake  Management  Society.  October.  Knoxville,  Tennessee.  EPA  440/5-84-001.
 Canfield,  D.E.  Jr.,  and  M.V.  Hoyer.  1988.  Influence  of  nutrient  enrichment  and  light  availability  on  the  abundance  of  aquatic  macrophytes  in  Florida  streams.  Canadian  Journal  of  Fisheries  and  Aquatic  Sciences  45:1467-1472.
 Canfield,  D.E.  Jr.,  E.  Phlips,  and  C.M.  Duarte.  1989.  Factors  influencing  the  abundance  of  blue-green  algae  in  Florida  lakes.  Canadian  Journal  of  Fisheries  and  Aquatic  Sciences  46:1232-1237.
 Agusti,  S.,  C.M.  Duarte,  and  D.E.  Canfield  Jr.  1990.  Phytoplankton  abundance  in  Florida  lakes:  Evidence  for  the  frequent  lack  of  nutrient  limitation.  Limnology  and  Oceanography  35:181-188
 Bachmann,  R.  W.,  M.  V.  Hoyer,  and  D.  E.  Canfield  Jr.  2000.  Internal  heterotrophy  following  the  switch  from  macrophytes  to  algae  in  Lake  Apopka,  Florida.  Hydrobiologia  418:  217-227.
 Bachmann,  R.W.,  M.V.  Hoyer  and  D.E.  Canfield,  Jr.  2004.  Aquatic  plants  and  nutrients  in  Florida  lakes.  Aquatics:  26(3)4-11
 Bachmann,  R.  W.  2001.  The  limiting  factor  concept  What  stops  growth?  Lakeline  21(1):26-28.  
 Van,  T.  K.,  W.  T.  Haller  and  G.  Bowes.  1976.  Comparison  of  the  photosynthetic  characteristics  of  three  submersed  aquatic  plants.  Plant  Physiol.  58:761-768.  
 
 
 Copyright  2004:  Tom  Barr
 www.BarrReport.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Madan
Admin
Admin



Joined: Jun 29, 2003
Posts: 7084
Location: Bengaluru, India

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 8:21 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Hello  Tom,
 
 Welcome  to  IAH.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dominic01
Frequent Visitor to IAH
Frequent Visitor to IAH



Joined: Mar 03, 2004
Posts: 104
Location: Chennai

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 9:18 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Tom,
 
 Its  wornderful  to  have  you  here  in  this  community.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beta
Committed Member of IAH
Committed Member of IAH



Joined: Jun 29, 2003
Posts: 4259
Location: Chennai

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 9:51 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 WOW!  We  have  some  serious  experts  here  Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
kuksinhyd
Regular Poster on IAH
Regular Poster on IAH



Joined: Jan 14, 2004
Posts: 288
Location: Hyderabad, India

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 10:00 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Welcome  to  IAH  Tom
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
amitava
Regular Poster on IAH
Regular Poster on IAH



Joined: Mar 31, 2004
Posts: 375
Location: Kolkata

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 10:05 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Hi  Tom,
 
 Welcome  to  IAH.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger
amitava
Regular Poster on IAH
Regular Poster on IAH



Joined: Mar 31, 2004
Posts: 375
Location: Kolkata

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 10:07 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Hi  Tom,
 
 Welcome  to  IAH.
 
 I  am  following  the  estimative  index  method  for  the  last  3  months.  The  result  is  very  good.  I  have  no  algae  till  now.  initially  there  were  some  hair  algae  but  they  vanished  after  some  time.  
 
 regards
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger
rrsriram
Frequent Visitor to IAH
Frequent Visitor to IAH



Joined: Jun 25, 2004
Posts: 219
Location: Chennai, Tamil Nadu - India

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 10:34 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Welcome  to  IAH  Tom.
 
 Was  reading  your  other  articles  in  "The  Barr  Report"  and  was  interested  in  the  non  CO2  method  of  having  a  Planted  Tank.    
 
 Have  you  tried  this  method?    Would  really  like  to  know  how  it  worked  out.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
madhu_ulysses
Committed Member of IAH
Committed Member of IAH



Joined: Oct 28, 2004
Posts: 2450
Location: Salem, TN

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 10:48 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Great  article  Tom!    One  article  broke  all  myths  and  misconsuptions  on  planted  tanks  explained  on  a  scientific  ground!    Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
plantbrain
IAH New Member
IAH New Member



Joined: May 18, 2005
Posts: 14


Status: Offline
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 8:49 pm Post subject:  Reply with quote

                                                   
rrsriram  wrote:                
Welcome  to  IAH  Tom.
 
 Was  reading  your  other  articles  in  "The  Barr  Report"  and  was  interested  in  the  non  CO2  method  of  having  a  Planted  Tank.    
 
 Have  you  tried  this  method?    Would  really  like  to  know  how  it  worked  out.                

 
 Well,  I  kept  plants  long  before  I  had  CO2(I  started  using  this  about  15  years  ago).
 
 Yes,  I  do  very  well  with  non  CO2  methods,  I  have  an  article  on  the  BarrReport  to  that  extent  as  well.
 
 I  do  not  use  soil  for  non  CO2  tanks,  I  know  the  rates  and  dosing  routines(I  dose  weekly,  and  at  about  5-10x  less  than  CO2  enriched  tanks).
 
 So  it's  rather  easy  dose(once  a  week),  no  water  changes,  minimal  pruing  and  I  can  grow  about  any  plant  I  want,  Glossotigma,  Hairgrass  etc.
 
 Takes  5-10x  as  long,  but  the  tanks  look  good  after  a  few  months  of  growth.
 
 Regards,  
 Tom  Barr
 
 www.BarrReport.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rrsriram
Frequent Visitor to IAH
Frequent Visitor to IAH



Joined: Jun 25, 2004
Posts: 219
Location: Chennai, Tamil Nadu - India

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 10:25 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

                                                   
plantbrain  wrote:                
I  do  not  use  soil  for  non  CO2  tanks,  I  know  the  rates  and  dosing  routines(I  dose  weekly,  and  at  about  5-10x  less  than  CO2  enriched  tanks).
 
 So  it's  rather  easy  dose(once  a  week),  no  water  changes,  minimal  pruing  and  I  can  grow  about  any  plant  I  want,  Glossotigma,  Hairgrass  etc.
 
 Takes  5-10x  as  long,  but  the  tanks  look  good  after  a  few  months  of  growth.
 
 Regards,  
 Tom  Barr
 
 www.BarrReport.com                

 Hi  Tom,
 
 This  seems  to  be  ideal  for  me.    I  am  kind  of  lazy  and  maintaining  a  Planted  Tank  was  quiet  a  struggle  for  me.        I  had  a  2.5'  x  1.5'  x  2'  planted  tank  for  a  year  and  i  totally  mucked  it  up.    Stripped  it  and  converted  it  to  a  DISCUS  tank  now.    Planning  to  have  a  bigger  (4')  planted  tank.
 
 In  Chennai  the  water  temperature  reaches  around  33  Deg  Cent  in  Summer  and  around  28  Deg  Cent  during  winter.    That  way  if  i  start  the  tank  around  September  and  keep  it  running  till  March,  the  tank  would  have  settled  down  properly.    What  do  you  suggest?
 
 Will  definitely  try  out  this  method  and  let  everyone  know  how  it  works.
 
 Thanks  a  lot  for  your  tip.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
plantbrain
IAH New Member
IAH New Member



Joined: May 18, 2005
Posts: 14


Status: Offline
PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2005 12:17 pm Post subject:  Reply with quote

                                                   
rrsriram  wrote:                

 
 Hi  Tom,
 This  seems  to  be  ideal  for  me.    I  am  kind  of  lazy  and  maintaining  a  Planted  Tank  was  quiet  a  struggle  for  me.        I  had  a  2.5'  x  1.5'  x  2'  planted  tank  for  a  year  and  i  totally  mucked  it  up.    Stripped  it  and  converted  it  to  a  DISCUS  tank  now.    Planning  to  have  a  bigger  (4')  planted  tank.
 
 In  Chennai  the  water  temperature  reaches  around  33  Deg  Cent  in  Summer  and  around  28  Deg  Cent  during  winter.    That  way  if  i  start  the  tank  around  September  and  keep  it  running  till  March,  the  tank  would  have  settled  down  properly.    What  do  you  suggest?
 
 Will  definitely  try  out  this  method  and  let  everyone  know  how  it  works.
 
 Thanks  a  lot  for  your  tip.                

 
 You  folks  would  do  well  to  use  small  fans  to  cool  the  water  through  evaporation.
 Many  folks  in  Singapore  have  hot  weather.  Their  list  always  brings  up  this  issue.
 
 Only  33C?  hehe,  try  35-40C.  In  Florida  it  is  hot  and  humid,  many  plants  can  be  found  in  water  up  to  35-40C.
 
 Yes,  non  CO2  tanks  are  quite  nice.
 If  you  follow  the  princples  and  set  them  up  well,  you'll  have  great  success.
 
 I  have  a  few  tanks  I  plan  on  entering  in  the  nano  contest  just  to  prove  my  point.
 
 Aquascaping  and  non  CO2  planted  tanks  can  and  do  well  together.
 I  grow  Gloss  and  hair  grass  as  well  as  other  "CO2  only"  plants.
 
 Most  folks  drop  their  jaw  when  they  see  my  non  CO2  tanks  and  I've  perfected  it  quite  a  bit  over  the  last  7-8  years  or  so.
 
 Most  cannot  believe  it's  a  non  CO2  tank.
 
 It's  not  EI  mind  you,  but  it's  not  what  Diana  Walstad  suggest  quite  either.
 
 We  are  all  lazy  to  some  degree.
 The  trade  offs  are  what  determine  things  as  well  as  us  being  honest  with  ourselves.
 
 High  light/CO2=>  more  work,  fast  growth  and  high  gains.
 Low  light/CO2  slower  more  manageable  growth,  reasonably  fast  growth,  high  gains,  robust  combination
 Non  CO2,  for  the  lazy  bum,  slow  growth,  easy  to  maintain,  patience  for  the  tank  to  mature  and  grow  it  well.
 
 The  same  can  be  said  for  marine  systesm  and  coral/macro  algae/marine  plants.
 
 
 Regards,  
 Tom  Barr
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
murthy
Regular Poster on IAH
Regular Poster on IAH



Joined: Feb 20, 2004
Posts: 673
Location: Bangalore

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2005 8:34 pm Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Smile  Hello,Mr.Tom  Barr.Thankyou  for  the  exhaustive  article.It  got  me  exhausted!I  guess  I  will  need  to  read  it  a  couple  of  times  before  anything  percolates  into  my  skull.But,then  again,It  is  reassuring  that  there  is  someone  on  the  forum  with  sound  scientific  principles.I  will  do  my  best  to  understand  and  make  good  use  of  it!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger
plantbrain
IAH New Member
IAH New Member



Joined: May 18, 2005
Posts: 14


Status: Offline
PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2005 12:12 pm Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Hi,  the  concept  is  and  method  itself  is  very  simple,  but  it  allows  folks  to  try  anything  they  want  fairly  easily.  Don't  be  at  all  intimidated.  
 
 All  it  does  is  change  50%  of  the  water  each  week  to  prevent  any  thing  building  up,  and  dosing  3x  a  week  to  add  things  back  as  plants  remove  them  to  prevent  anything  from  running  out.
 
 I  dose  3  things  using  a  teaspoon  set:
 KNO3
 KH2PO4
 Trace  elments(Tropica  Master  grow  etc)
 
 That's  it,  takes  as  long  to  feed  to  the  fish  as  it  does  to  dose.
 
 Anyone  can  do  this  and  it  does  not  cost  much.
 
 Then  you  can  work  on  aquascaping,  which  maybe  why  you  got  into  the  hobby.  Most  have  lower  expectations  upon  entry,  they  just  want  things  to  grow.
 
 So  focus  on  that,  the  plant's  needs.
 
 The  "how"  is  very  easy,  the  "why"  is  a  far  more  prickly  question  to  answer.
 
 Regards,  
 Tom  Barr
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
murthy
Regular Poster on IAH
Regular Poster on IAH



Joined: Feb 20, 2004
Posts: 673
Location: Bangalore

Status: Offline
PostPosted: Mon Jun 06, 2005 11:53 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 This  may  be  a  dud  question....please  pardon.
 
         Would  it  be  ok  to  use  old  aquarium  water  from  another  fish  only  tank  to  make  water  changes  on  the  planted  tank?(for  example  a  discus  tank,where  water  changes  are  done  daily)....i  figured  that  would  be  like  adding  minor  quantities  of  nitrates.That  cannot  be  bad.There  is  a  serious  issue  on  water  usage,especially  when  fish  nuts  like  me  use  HUGE  amounts  of  water!
 
       Thanks  again!  Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger
Display posts from previous:
Post new topic  Reply to topic   printer-friendly view http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/ Forum Index ->  Macro and Micro Fertilisers All times are UTC + 5.5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You cannot download files in this forum




Powered By: phpBB © 2001 - 2006 phpBB Group
Nuke-Evo Conversion By: Evo-Themez | iCGstation v1.0 Template By Ray


[News Feed] [Forums Feed] [Downloads Feed] [Web Links Feed] [Validate robots.txt]


Forum Modification Pack by Revolution-Mods.

PHP-Nuke Copyright © 2006 by Francisco Burzi.
All logos, trademarks and posts in this site are property of their respective owners, all the rest © 2006 by the site owner.
Powered by Nuke-Evolution
[ Page Generation: 6048 Seconds | Memory Usage: 3.33 MB | DB Queries: 124 ]

Do Not Click