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http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/ :: View topic - Bangalore's bore-well water chemical composition
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Bangalore's bore-well water chemical composition
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beta
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:07 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Since  this  discussion  is  not  taking  a  good  turn..  Arpan  How  about  less  of  smilies  and  more  of  proof.  Since  you  seem  to  have  done  a  lot  of  testing  i'm  sure  you  can  put  up  some  of  those  results  here.
 
 and  kindly  refrain  from  making  statements  like  "and  if  u  dont  know  the  meaning  of  SW/FW  culturing,  then  u  are  not  worth  interacting  with!!!!!!"
 Everybody  is  worth  interacting  with  in  IAH!
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arpanlib
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:08 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 guys,  read  this:
 
 
 
 The  Truth  About  Our  Environment  and  Water—
 
 
 What  really  happened  to  our  tap  water  and  underground  water?  
 Clean  water  is  one  of  the  most  important  needs  of  our  bodies.  It  is  a  sad  fact  that  something  as  essential  to  life  as  clean  drinking  water  can  no  longer  be  granted  to  us.  Unsafe  water  is  not  just  a  third  world  problem.  In  fact,  safe  drinking  water  is  even  harder  to  find  specially  in  industrially  developed  countries  such  as  the  U.S.  
 
 According  to  research  articles  and  news,  most  tap  and  well  water  in  the  U.S.  now  are  not  safe  for  drinking  due  to  heavy  industrial  and  environmental  pollution.  We  have  reached  to  a  point  that,  all  sources  of  our  drinking  water,  including  municipal  water  systems,  wells,  lakes,  rivers,  and  even  glaciers,  contain  some  level  of  contamination.  Contaminants  range  from  naturally-occurring  minerals  to  man-made  chemicals  and  by-products.  While  many  contaminants  are  found  at  levels  not  enough  not  to  cause  immediate  discomforts  or  sicknesses  ,  it  is  proven  that  even  low-level  exposure  to  many  common  contaminants  will,  over  time,  cause  severe  illness  including  liver  damage,  cancer,  and  other  serious  ailments.  Even  the  chemicals  commonly  used  to  treat  municipal  water  supplies  such  as  chlorine  and  fluoride  are  toxic  and  are  known  to  have  significant  adverse  effects  on  the  human  body.
 
 
 Some  more  facts:
 
 There  are  35,000  pesticides  containing  600  chemical  compounds.  Yet  municipal  water  systems  are  only  required  to  test  for  six.  Many  of  these  chemicals  are  known  to  cause  birth  defects,  nerve  damage,  sterility  and  cancer.  
 The  General  Accounting  Office  reports  that  20%  of  the  nation's  65,000  community  systems  are  unable  to  meet  minimum  standards  set  by  the  Safe  Drinking  Water  Act.      
 More  than  700  organic  chemicals  have  been  identified  in  drinking  water,  and  some  of  them  are  suspected  cancer  causing  agents.    
 A  recent  government  study  found  that  more  than  25%  of  all  large  U.S.  public  water  systems  contain  traces  of  one  or  more  toxic  substances.  ...  Public  water  systems  do  not  test  for  the  carcinogens  and  other  dangerous  chemicals  that  are  being  found.  
 
 
 
 
 
 THIS  IS  NOT  WRITTEN  BY  ME.  NEED  MORE  "scientific"  PROOF?  
 
 
 Arpan
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retro_gk
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:14 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 This  does  not  mention  TDS  or  bacteria...  it  is  concerned  with  environmental  carcinogens.
 
 So  yes,  I  need  proof  pertinent  to  the  discussion  on  hand.
 
 P.S  FWIW,  I  currently  work  on  identifying  organic  contaminants  in  drinking  water  and  methods  of  removal.
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arpanlib
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:24 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 what  else  am  i  trying  to  say  man?
 
 we  are  using  this  water!!!!    are  we  not?
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madhu_ulysses
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:25 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 This  doesn't  seem  to  be  a  "scientific  proof",  rather  a  fact  sheet  about  pollution  and  health.    A  scientific  proof  would  conclude  on  HOW  things  happen    more  than  WHAT  happens.
 To  be  precise,  we  need  HOW  does  water  passing  through  soil  &  rocks  have  more  CHANCES  of  carrying  bacteria  along.
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arpanlib
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:26 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 HARD  WATER  --  RANGES  AND  PROBLEMS
 
 Hard  water  is  a  serious  problem,  and  it  is  a  common  one.  Water  in  85%  of  the  United  States  is  so  hard  it  should  be  softened  to  be  of  maximum  usefulness.
 
 There  are  only  a  few  areas  where  water  is  sufficiently  soft  to  be  satisfactory  for  most  home­making  needs.  No  natural  water  supply  is  completely  free  of  hardness.
 
 Communities  that  draw  water  directly  from  snow-filled  mountain  streams  enjoy  nearly  ideal  water  in  terms  of  a  low  amount  of  hardness.
 
 New  York  City  with  supplies  of  one  to  three  grains  of  hardness  per  gallon  has  relatively  soft  water.  Even  here  there  are  opportunities  for  sales  of  water  conditioning  equipment.  There  are  industries  which  must  have  water  free  of  hardness  materials.  Some  laundries  in  the  area,  for  example,  have  found  that  zero  soft  water  provides  substantial  soap  savings.
 
 Actually,  the  hardness  of  water  supplies  in  this  country  ranges  from  1  to  350  gpg  (17.1  to  5985  mg/l).
 
 Most  waters  possess  hardness  minerals  in  amounts  from  3  to  50  gpg  (51.3  to  855  mg/1).  Unfortunately,  where  water  is  extremely  hard,  the  problem  is  often  compounded  by  the  presence  of  other  contaminants  such  as  iron  and  manganese.
 
 Most  people  are  quite  aware  that  a  water  containing  15  to  30  grains  (256.5  to  513  mg/1)  of  hardness  minerals  is  definitely  hard  and  difficult  to  use.
 
 On  the  other  hand,  many  people  will  tolerate  a  5  grain  (85.5  mg/1)  water  that  is  very  objectionable  to  anyone  accustomed  to  using  completely  soft  water.
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arpanlib
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:28 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Contaminants  range  from  naturally-occurring  minerals  to  man-made  chemicals  and  by-products.
 
 Read  it  twice,  then  maybe  it  makes  sense.
 
 Arpan
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arpanlib
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:33 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 There  is  no  single  measure  that  constitutes  good  water  quality  ...  it  depends  on  its  use.  Also,  keep  in  mind  that  some  water  quality  problems  (iron,  manganese  and  turbidity)  can  be  treated.  Water  quality  is  defined  by  analyzing  it  in  terms  of  its:  
 
 Chemical  Content:  Hardness  (calcium  +  magnesium),  Metals  (iron  etc),  nutrients  (nitrogen  and  phosphorus),  chloride,  sodium,  organic  compounds,  etc.  
 Physical  Content:  Turbidity,  colour,  odour,  etc.  
 
 Biological  Content:  Fecal  coliform,  total  coliform,  viruses,  etc(1).  
 
 Good  quality  (potable)  drinking  water  is  free  from  disease-causing  organisms,  harmful  chemical  substances  and  radioactive  matter,  tastes  good,  is  aesthetically  appealing  and  is  free  from  objectionable  colour  or  odour.  It  should  be  emphasized  that  there  is  a  difference  between  "pure  water"  and  "safe  drinking  water".  Pure  water,  often  defined  as  water  containing  no  minerals  or  chemicals,  does  not  exist  naturally  in  the  environment.  Safe  drinking  water,  on  the  other  hand,  may  retain  naturally  occurring  minerals  and  chemicals  such  as  calcium,  potassium,  sodium  or  fluoride  which  are  actually  beneficial  to  human  health.  These  will  impart  a  taste  to  the  water  that  may  take  some  getting  used  to.  
 
 In  some  cases,  however,  groundwater  can  be  contaminated  with  chemicals  or  bacteria.  For  example,  a  recent  study  has  found  that  the  health  of  many  people  has  been  put  at  risk  due  to  the  presence  of  naturally  occurring    in  drinking  water  wells!
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madhu_ulysses
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:35 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

                                                   
arpanlib  wrote:                
HARD  WATER  --  RANGES  AND  PROBLEMS
 
 Hard  water  is  a  serious  problem,  and  it  is  a  common  one.  Water  in  85%  of  the  United  States  is  so  hard  it  should  be  softened  to  be  of  maximum  usefulness.
 
 There  are  only  a  few  areas  where  water  is  sufficiently  soft  to  be  satisfactory  for  most  home­making  needs.  No  natural  water  supply  is  completely  free  of  hardness.
 
 Communities  that  draw  water  directly  from  snow-filled  mountain  streams  enjoy  nearly  ideal  water  in  terms  of  a  low  amount  of  hardness.
 
 New  York  City  with  supplies  of  one  to  three  grains  of  hardness  per  gallon  has  relatively  soft  water.  Even  here  there  are  opportunities  for  sales  of  water  conditioning  equipment.  There  are  industries  which  must  have  water  free  of  hardness  materials.  Some  laundries  in  the  area,  for  example,  have  found  that  zero  soft  water  provides  substantial  soap  savings.
 
 Actually,  the  hardness  of  water  supplies  in  this  country  ranges  from  1  to  350  gpg  (17.1  to  5985  mg/l).
 
 Most  waters  possess  hardness  minerals  in  amounts  from  3  to  50  gpg  (51.3  to  855  mg/1).  Unfortunately,  where  water  is  extremely  hard,  the  problem  is  often  compounded  by  the  presence  of  other  contaminants  such  as  iron  and  manganese.
 
 Most  people  are  quite  aware  that  a  water  containing  15  to  30  grains  (256.5  to  513  mg/1)  of  hardness  minerals  is  definitely  hard  and  difficult  to  use.
 
 On  the  other  hand,  many  people  will  tolerate  a  5  grain  (85.5  mg/1)  water  that  is  very  objectionable  to  anyone  accustomed  to  using  completely  soft  water.                

 
 I've  read  it  thrice.    Quote  me  one  line  which  says  "hard  water  contains  more  bacteria".    I'd  like  to  remaind  that  this  topic  is  about  hardness  and  bacteria  and  not  about  hardness  and  iron  &  magnessium  or  any  other  chemical.
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arpanlib
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:36 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 In  summary,  flowing  surface  water  is  most  likely  to  have  bacterial  contamination,  pond  or  lake  water  is  most  likely  to  contain  blue-green  algae,  and  well  water,  particularly  in  arid  areas,  is  most  likely  to  have  high  mineral  concentrations.  Coliform  counts  and  measures  of  total  dissolved  solids  are  the  main  indications  of  water  quality.
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:41 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Hi,
 
 It  is  all  related.
 
 it  indirectly  explains,  that  more  the  water  passes  through  mediums  and  stuff,  it  is  more  prone  to  bacteria.
 
 If  u  cant  make  sense  of  this  stuff,  then  i  cannot  help.  better  u  do  some  online  research.
 
 
 
 
 Total  Dissolved  Solids  (TDS)  are  the  total  amount  of  mobile  charged  ions,  including  minerals,  salts  or  metals  dissolved  in  a  given  volume  of  water,  expressed  in  units  of  mg  per  unit  volume  of  water  (mg/L),  also  referred  to  as  parts  per  million  (ppm).  TDS  is  directly  related  to  the  purity  and  quality  of  water  and  water  purification  systems  and  affects  everything  that  consumes,  lives  in,  or  uses  water,  whether  organic  or  inorganic.
 
 hope  this  makes  sense.
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arpanlib
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:44 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 Biological  Impurities:  Bacteria,  Viruses,  and  Parasites.
 Microorganisms  originating  from  human  and  animal  feces,  or  other  sources,  can  cause  waterborne  diseases.  Approximately  4,000  cases  of  waterborne  illness  are  reported  each  year  in  the  U.S.  Additionally,  many  of  the  minor  illnesses  and  gastrointestinal  disorders  that  go  unreported  can  be  traced  to  organisms  found  in  water  supplies.
 
 Biological  impurities  have  largely  been  eliminated  in  municipal  water  systems  with  chlorine  treatment.  However,  such  treated  water  can  still  become  biologically  contaminated.  Residual  chlorine  throughout  the  system  may  not  be  adequate,  and  therefore  microorganisms  can  grow  in  stagnant  water  sitting  in  storage  facilities  or  at  the  ends  of  pipes.
 
 Water  from  private  wells  and  small  public  systems  is  more  vulnerable  to  biological  contamination.  These  systems  generally  use  untreated  groundwater  supplies,  which  could  be  polluted  due  to  septic  tank  leakage  or  poor  construction.
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arpanlib
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 12:49 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 if  u  cant  make  sense  -  bad  luck.
 
 If  u  r  using  RO  and  DI  -  u  r  better  off.
 
 if  u  want  me  to  show  u  the  lines,  then  dont  ask  me  weather  the  chicken  came  first  or  the  hen!!!!!
 
 it  is  clearly  states  that  more  the  water  passes  through  mediums,  more  TDS.  right?
 
 When  water  will  pass  through  mediums  it  will  pick  up  bacterias  from  feces  or  dirts  or  organic  or  inorganic  matters  or  from  chemical  wastes.  right?
 
 thus  the  more  the  water  passes  through  medium  =  more  chances  or  bacteria.    simple.  dont  have  a  mind  block.  put  on  your  thinking  caps.
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arpanlib
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 1:04 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

 where  do  FACTS  come  from?    i  guess  from  scientific  researches  and  analysis.  thus  when  a  study  is  carried  out,  it  leads  to  conclusions  and  facts.
 
 
 the  above  are  scientific  proofs  and  not  home  made  recepies.
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retro_gk
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 1:25 am Post subject:  Reply with quote

                                                   
arpanlib  wrote:                

 
 When  water  will  pass  through  mediums  it  will  pick  up  bacterias  from  feces  or  dirts  or  organic  or  inorganic  matters  or  from  chemical  wastes.  right?
                 

 
 WRONG!!!  not  all  water  passes  through  soil  heavily  contaminated  with  sewage  or  fecal  matter.  If  it  did,  most  of  us  would  spend  a  large  portion  of  our  time  in  the  loo.
 
 The  "facts"  you  have  posted  refer  to  the  US,  which  is  highly  industrialised.  I  do  not  think  India  is.  The  pollution  problems  we  face  in  India  WRT  chemical  contaminants  are  somewhat  different.
 
 
 
 
                                                 
Quote:                
In  summary,  flowing  surface  water  is  most  likely  to  have  bacterial  contamination,  pond  or  lake  water  is  most  likely  to  contain  blue-green  algae,  and  well  water,  particularly  in  arid  areas,  is  most  likely  to  have  high  mineral  concentrations.  Coliform  counts  and  measures  of  total  dissolved  solids  are  the  main  indications  of  water  quality.                

 
 The  above  lists  coliform  counts  as  2  unique  indicators  of  water  quality.  It  DOES  NOT  say  they  are  related.  If  you  think  they  are,  I  have  nothing  more  to  say.
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