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http://indianaquariumhobbyist.com/community/ :: View topic - Schooling Reef safe fish
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Schooling Reef safe fish
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ranjithc
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 12:19 pm Post subject: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 friends,
 can  some  one  please  list  out  some  of  the  schooling  reef  safe  fish
 
 I  want  to  add  some  schooling  for  my  new  setup
 
 Water  column  size  is  4.5'x  2'x  20"  (LxHxW)
 
 there  will  be  many  corals  so  am  looking  only  at  peacefull  fishies   Chuckle  
 and  offcourse  one  that  is  having  a  good  captivity  record  and  will  not  die  in  captivity  easily.
 
 i  heard  that  blue  chromis  are  nice  shooling  fishes.  any  other  options?
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Kaushik
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 12:35 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 Dear  Ranjith  c
 If  you  are  looking  for  shooling  reef  fish  than  the  following  sp.  can  be  a  good  choice.
 Bangai  Cardinal
 Green  Chromis
 
 
 Regards
 
 Kaushik
 Indore
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Shankar
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 12:40 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 Banggai  wont  shoal  or  keep  together  unless  kept  in  a  large  colony  with  big  fishes  that  the  cardinals  feel  afraid  of.  Green  chromis  is  a  better  choice.  Hardy  and  long  lasting.
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ranjithc
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 1:09 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 green  chromis  looks  a  bit  dull   Sad  
 
 did  think  of  firefish  or  fire  goby
 perculas  are  pretty  agressive.
 even  in  600  liter  tank  i  could  not  keep  4  of  them  without  incidents.
 
 flame  angel  in  4-6  numbers???
 butterflys  are  defenitly  out  as  they  are  not  reef  safe.
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 2:01 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 You  can  keep  a  school  of  4-6  Pomacentris  auriventris.
 
 But  do  not  go  for  Bangaii  Cardinal.  When  U  introduce  a  group  they  will  pair  in  2.  And  if  the  group  is  in  odd  number,  then  the  other  will  kill  the  last  odd  one.
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ranjithc
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 2:32 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 thanks  dhritiman.
 i  just  saw  some  pics
 would  anyone  advise  a  group  of  anthias  ?
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cokeamod
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 2:42 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 Hello  there!  Smile  
 Good  to  see  here  regularly!  Dont  think  group  of  dwarf  angels  is  a  good  idea.  Also,  they  are  not  reef  safe.  
 
 Why  not  go  for  skunk  clowns,  they  are  quite  peaceful  and  will  stay  in  a  group.
 
 If  you  are  willing  to  feed  3-4  times,  how  about  anthia  sp.?
 
 Clown  gobies,  they  stay  small,  are  territorial,  but  if  many  of  them  are  present,  aggression  will  be  distributed  in  the  group.
 
 3-5  small  yellow  tangs,  they  establish  a  hierarchical  pyramid  and  can  be  kept  together.
 
 yellow  tail  chromis\damsel?  can  also  stay  together.
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ranjithc
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 2:59 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 amodji..
 nice  to  meet  u  here  as  well.
 
 ya.  anthia  is  what  i  asked  about  in  earlier  post   Very Happy  
 would  look  awsome.  was  just  wondering  if  they  will  get  too  big  eventually.
 all  in  all  it  is  not  a  500gal  setup   Chuckle  
 
 the  tang  is  not  a  bad  idea.  but  is  yellow  better  or  blue  one  (dory)
 somewhere  i  read  yellow  tangs  can  be  agressive.
 
 damsel  sey  toh  main  thak  gaya.  kutch  different  Chuckle  
 
 i  think  am  gonna  have  to  decide  between  anthias  n  chromis.
 last  time  when  we  added  the  chromis,  they  paired  off  soon.
 if  they  pair  off  then  it  looks  lousy  since  it  looks  like  too  many  of  them  and  not  schooling  either   Sad
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udhay
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 3:43 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 CHOOSING  CORALS  AND  ANEMONES  
 When  setting  up  your  marine  fish  aquarium,  it  is  possible  to  keep  a  number  of  invertebrates  together,  which  would  include  corals,  anemones,  and  shrimp.  However,  to  make  this  blended  family  successful,  some  specific  things  should  be  understood.  As  an  example,  not  all  species  are  compatible.  Therefore,  by  putting  them  all  in  the  same  aquarium,  you  would  have  one  species  eating  another  species.  To  get  started  with  choosing  corals  and  anemones,  consider  the  following:
 Â· A  common  group  of  anemones  and  corals  are  known  as  Cnidarians.  Both  of  these  invertebrates  are  attached  to  the  bottom  of  the  aquarium  or  some  type  of  hard  surface.  Once  there,  they  generally  stay  put.  However,  anemones  and  corals  are  popular  in  that  they  are  colorful  but  you  need  to  maintain  optimal  water  quality.  
 Â· Although  corals  can  be  kept,  anemones  are  much  easier  to  maintain.  Even  so,  both  of  these  invertebrates  will  need  the  best  possible  water  quality.  This  means  good  oxygen  content,  no  nitrates,  excellent  aeration,  and  good  circulation.  
 Â· Corals  and  anemones  come  in  a  variety  of  vibrant  colors  to  include  white,  yellow,  and  pink,  green,  purple,  orange,  and  red,  which  all  depends  on  the  color  of  the  photosynthetic  algae  living  in  the  tissue.  
 Â· Anemones  are  quite  mobile,  meaning  they  will  slowly,  creep  along  the  bottom  of  the  tank  using  what  is  called  a  Basal  Disk.  Once  the  anemone  finds  a  comfortable  spot,  it  will  settle  down.  
 Â· Common  types  of  anemones  are  the  Florida  anemone,  Clownfish,  and  Carpet  anemone.  
 Keep  in  mind  that  your  success  in  keeping  anemones  and  corals  will  depend  on  choosing  healthy  ones.  What  you  want  to  avoid  are  anemones  that  have  open,  loose  mouths,  torn  bases,  or  deflated  tentacles.  A  white  or  transparent  anemone  is  generally  healthy  because  they  have  expelled  all  the  zooxanthellae.  In  fact,  a  healthy  anemone  can  easily  live  to  nine  months  or  more.  What  happens  is  that  as  the  anemone  grows  old,  it  will  begin  to  waste  away.  Therefore,  if  you  find  an  anemone  that  appears  to  be  healthy  but  you  notice  the  tentacles  are  short  not  long,  this  could  be  a  sign  of  the  deterioration  process.
 You  should  pay  close  attention  when  the  anemone  is  removed  from  the  aquarium  at  the  pet  store.  If  it  was  not  well  attached,  it  may  not  be  healthy.  The  anemone  should  also  provide  some  type  of  reaction  to  being  pulled  from  its  home.  Then,  the  anemone  should  have  a  sticky  feeling  to  the  body.  If  that  is  missing,  the  ability  to  fire  a  stinging  cell  could  be  the  problem,  meaning  the  anemone  is  a  fussy  eater.  Unfortunately,  fussy  anemones  are  difficult  to  spot  and  by  the  time  you  notice  a  problem,  it  is  too  late.
 Now,  if  you  keep  Clownfish,  they  need  a  lot  of  light,  usually  between  3  to  6  watts  per  gallon.  For  this,  we  recommend  you  choose  bulbs  that  are  50%  actinic  and  50%  full  spectrum.  Most  of  their  nutrition  will  be  taken  from  symbiotic  algae  living  within  their  own  tissue.  In  addition,  anemones  prefer  organic  waste-free  aquariums.  Moderate  current  and  clean  water  appear  to  be  the  two  most  important  factors,  along  with  water  temperature  of  78  to  80  degrees  and  a  pH  level  of  8.2  to  8.4.
 Anemones  need  to  be  fed  three  times  a  week  to  once  bi-weekly.  In  other  words,  they  all  have  their  own  preference.  The  food  would  include  raw  shrimp,  but  no  larger  than  the  anemone’s  own  mouth.  Other  frozen  organisms  such  as  lance  fish,  clams,  silversides,  and  scallops  are  enjoyed.  What  you  want  to  avoid  is  using  liquid  or  target  food,  which  can  actually  cause  a  problem  with  the  water  quality.
 Best  Anemone  Choices  
 Some  types  of  anemones  that  you  might  keep  include:
 Â· Saddle  Carpet  â€“  Reddish  to  pink  color  around  the  mouth,  short  tentacles,  and  densely  packed.  
 Â· Maroon,  Bubble-Tipped,  or  Bulb  Anemone  â€“  In  captivity,  they  will  temporarily  lose  their  bubble  tips.  The  tentacles  are  long  and  straight,  usually  with  a  greenish  color.  The  color  of  this  anemone  varies  also  a  rose  color  is  common  
 Â· Long-Tentacled  Anemone  â€“  This  anemone  has  long,  smooth  tentacles,  a  round,  flat  oral  disk,  and  a  base  color  of  bright  red  or  orange.  
 Worst  Anemone  Choices  
 These  anemones  are  hard  to  keep:
 Â· Sebae  Anemone,  Singapore  Anemone,  or  Pink-Tipped  Anemone  â€“  The  tentacles  can  be  long  and  thin  or  short  and  fat  with  magenta  to  yellow/green  color.  The  color  of  the  anemone  is  typically  white,  pink,  pink/purple,  or  yellow.  For  some  reason,  the  white  and  yellow  species  are  hard  to  keep  alive.  
 Â· African  Anemone,  Ritteri,  or  Yellow-Tipped  Anemone  â€“  Tentacles  are  long  with  blunt  tips  and  the  base  is  red  or  purple.  These  anemones  stay  toward  the  water’s  surface,  needing  extra  bright  lighting,  which  can  have  an  affect  on  the  other  residents.  
 Â· Giant  Carpet  Anemone  or  Colored  Carpet  Anemone  â€“  These  anemones  have  short,  pointed  tentacles  that  vibrate.  The  anemone  bas  is  blue,  yellow,  or  bright  green  with  white  tips  on  the  tentacles.  Unfortunately,  these  anemones  sting  Clownfish.  They  will  also  eat  other  anemones,  making  them  a  poor  choice.  
 This  idea  was  send  by  a  friend  to  me  
 Reg:udhay
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ranjithc
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 4:13 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 Udhay,
 i  dont  understand  Surprised  
 what  has  all  this  info  (good  info)  got  to  do  with  schooling  fish??
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 4:43 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 Hi  ranjith,I  know  of  a  reef  tank(actually  mainly  of  zooanthids,mushrooms  and  the  sorts)...which  houses  9  yellow  tangs.The  day  the  tangs  were  released,there  seemed  to  be  a  lot  of  displaying,face-offs.They  must  have  been  establishing  the  peck  order.But  now  its  a  brilliant  sight...at  the  risk  of  shifting  all  viewer  attention  from  invertebrates  to  the  yellow  tangs  busily  pecking  away  at  any  algae,24/7!The  tank  is  a  rather  large  one,800  ltrs,6ftx2ftx2.5ftheight.With  a  fairly  large  sump  ~  400ltr.But  I  think  if  numbers  are  scaled  down  to  match  your  tank,it  should  work.Dont  expect  any  greenery  to  make  it  in  such  a  tank(neither  any  maroon  algae)
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 5:00 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 murthy
 when  u  say  no  maroon  algae,  do  you  mean  the  slime  algae??
 that  would  be  wonderfull  news   Clapping  
 
 my  tank  is  not  800  liters  but  is  close  to  600  including  sump.  so  maybe  4  would  be  good.
 
 do  yellow  tangs  require  lots  of  caves?  cause  am  planning  to  go  slightly  away  from  the  regular  aquascaping  of  a  wall  of  rocks  piled  against  the  back  glass.
 
 Maybe  a  solitary  boulder  or  2  with  sea  grass  bed.  will  the  tang  leave  the  grass/weed  alone  or  will  it  be  biriyani  for  him?
 
 Rubble  zone  types  biotope  with  one  or  max  2  families  of  corals.
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aquascapes
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Joined: Dec 19, 2005
Posts: 2753
Location: Surat, Gujarat

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 7:02 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 Dear  Udhay,
 
                                                 
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Although  corals  can  be  kept,  anemones  are  much  easier  to  maintain                

 I'm  sure  you  will  change  your  opinion  once  you  keep  them!!
 
                                                 
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Corals  and  anemones  come  in  a  variety  of  vibrant  colors  to  include  white,  yellow,  and  pink,  green,  purple,  orange,  and  red,  which  all  depends  on  the  color  of  the  photosynthetic  algae  living  in  the  tissue                

 The  colour  is  not  exactly  the  algae  but  the  pigments  that  the  algae  produce  to  nullify  the  UV  radiation.  I  can  provide  you  a  more  elaborate  explaination  but,  no  point  drifting  off  topic  here..
 
                                                 
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Common  types  of  anemones  are  the  Florida  anemone,  Clownfish,  and  Carpet  anemone.                

 I  guess  the  author  of  these  notes  have  never  heard  of  so  many  other  'common'  anemones  like  a  carrot  anemone  or  a  club  anemone  or  a  bubble  tip  anemone  etc  etc...
 
                                                 
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In  fact,  a  healthy  anemone  can  easily  live  to  nine  months  or  more                

   Crying or Very sad  what  then-after??
 
                                                 
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Now,  if  you  keep  Clownfish,  they  need  a  lot  of  light,  usually  between  3  to  6  watts  per  gallon.                

 That  is  indeed  interesting  the  author  should  realise  that  a  clownfish  does  not  have  any  symbiotic  relation  with  zooxanthellae  so  they  will  practically  live  a  healthy  life  even  without  any  light  at  all!!!
 
 Anyways,  back  to  the  topic.........
 @Ranjit,
 Buddy  we  must  understand  one  thing  that  a  coral  reef  is  a  very  competitive  environment  where  billions  of  life  forms  colonise  a  very  small  area  and  actually  survive  the  competition  by  mass  production.  It  is  a  garden  that  has  learned  to  survive  rather  'adapted'  to  the  harsh  conditions  of  a  desert!  Now,  you  must  be  wondering  why  do  I  compare  such  a  rich  ecology  as  a  reef  to  a  desert?  well,  it  is  the  nutrition  poor  water  that  has  almost  nothing  to  offer  and  whatever  is  available  gets  consumed  in  a  jiffy!  The  harsh  storms,  The  tropical  sun's  constant  radiation  etc.  These  are  some  reasons  for  the  corals  to  host  zooxanthellae  algae  in  it's  polyps.
 Again  you  must  be  wondering  why  am  I  saying  all  this?  Well,  to  just  give  you  an  idea  of  how  competitive  life  can  be  on  a  coral  reef.  This  very  instinct  of  survival  tends  to  bring  out  a  schooling  or  shoaling  behaviour  in  fish.  In  a  closed  environment  of  an  aquarium  where  the  fish  are  well  taken  care  of  and  there  is  no  fear  of  predation  they  tend  to  branch  out  of  the  school  and  establish  their  own  dominance,  this  often  leads  to  a  fight  and  as  we  all  know  the  stronger  one  survives!!
 If  you  want  a  schooling  or  a  shoaling  behaviour  to  be  displayed  the  basic  requirement  is  to  have  a  very  big  tank  jumbo  in  the  real  sense  of  the  word,  to  replicate  nature  as  closely  as  possible,  over-crowd  the  tank  (which  is  very  difficult  if  not  impossible  to  manage),  have  a  dominating  large  fish  in  the  tank  which  can  pose  a  threat  to  the  smaller  ones  (which  is  again  tricky  unless  you  work  your  brains  off  on  the  aquascaping)  and  so  on  and  so  forth.............
 So,  moral  of  the  long  story  is  not  to  desire  something  that  will  make  life  miserable  for  you   Smile
 
                                                 
Quote:                
do  yellow  tangs  require  lots  of  caves?  cause  am  planning  to  go  slightly  away  from  the  regular  aquascaping  of  a  wall  of  rocks  piled  against  the  back  glass.                

 I  don't  think  so  actually  they  are  bold  enough  to  venture  out  in  the  open  but,  the  regal  tangs  are  comparitively  more  timid  and  keep  hiding  once  in  a  while  infact  sometimes  even  swimming  in  circles  in  and  around  their  favourite  hang  outs.  I  guess  Apurva  had  even  uploaded  a  clip  sometime  back  of  his  tang's  strange  swimming  patterns.
 
                                                 
Quote:                
will  the  tang  leave  the  grass/weed  alone  or  will  it  be  biriyani  for  him?                

 depends  upon  how  well  you  supplement  their  diet  with  greens  and  how  many  tangs  you  are  housing  compared  to  how  many  rocks  of  macro-algae  you  have  in  the  tank.  Mostly  I  feel  they  will  relish  the  treat  and  very  soon  clear  the  rocks  of  all  green.
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Dhritiman
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Joined: Sep 15, 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 8:08 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

 Yep  I  agree  with  aquascapes.
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ranjithc
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Joined: Apr 12, 2007
Posts: 164
Location: HongKong

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 10:58 pm Post subject: Re: Schooling Reef safe fish Reply with quote

                                                   
Quote:                
Quote:   ?  Select  ?   
 In  fact,  a  healthy  anemone  can  easily  live  to  nine  months  or  more   
 
 >>  what  then-after??   Crying or Very sad  
 
                 

 
 aquascapes,
 that  was  just  too  much  and  i  also  burst  at  the  seams   ROFL  
 
 but  maybe  he  dint  mean  to  do  what  he  did  and  made  a  mistake.
 anyways,  I  like  the  perspective  you  gave  me  to  keep  things  simple  n  manageable  Thumb Up  
 
 I  do  know  and  agree  100%  about  the  diversity  stuff.  have  a  video  actually.  let  me  know  if  there  is  some  way  to  post  it  here  as  it  is  rather  large  AVI  file  around  few  100  mbs.  really  nice  one  on  lakshwadweep.
 
 that  is  why  i  want  to  move  to  biotope  and  limit  to  one  family  instead  of  mix  n  match.
 
 The  tangs  idea  seems  nice.  i  can  already  see  5  tangs  swimming  in  my  new  tank   Cheer  
 will  keep  the  macro  in  the  fudge.
 
 btw,  does  the  name  "aquascapes"  have  anything  to  do  with  your  expertise  in  aquascaping???  I  could  surely  use  some  good  pointers.   Thumb Up  
 Seriously...
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